Computer music - Wikipedia

Category: PC Music Setup

Category: PC Music Setup

DAW stands for Digital Audio Workstation. Different DAWs have different system requirements, so knowing which DAW you'll use can help you determine the kind of. If your interface is class-compliant, install the ASIO4ALL audio driver (below) instead of your computer's generic driver. The All-in-One PC with Intel® processor blends the best of all your devices in one versatile computing powerhouse. Streamlining an entire desktop system into an.

Category: PC Music Setup - long

UK

Acer Chromebook

Our last option for PC laptop for producing music

Last but not least, we have another Acer computer here for producing and recording. We’d say this is great for beginners or those who are looking to make simple tunes with a basic laptop. It’s one of our favorite budget-friendly laptops. You’re not getting a beast whatsoever, and it may not be able to handle your workload if you’re using a popular DAW with virtual instruments and what not, but it may be the solution for you if you’re just starting out. You can always upgrade later or sell this one once you’re done with it.

Check price of the Chromebook: US

FAQ

When inputting audio from DJMNXS, the following setting is required.

  1. Input/output setting for DJMNXS
  2. For Mac, creation of Audio MIDI Aggregate Device

Please switch the setting as follows when DJMNXS is connected to your computer with the USB cable.

 

shoppingdowntown.us setting for DJMNXS (Win/Mac)

Step1. Open [Preferences] > [Audio] > [Audio] and confirm the setting is as follows:

For Windows: [PIONEER DJM ASIO]
For Mac: [DJM output]

Step2. Open [Preferences] > [Audio] > [Input channels] and click [Setting Utility]

Step3. Switch [Input/Output] at [DJM Setting Utility] depending on your computer’s operating system (OS) as follows:

For Windows: ASIO 3 outputs 1 input 16 bits DirectX 1 output 1 input
For Mac: 6-channel output 2-channel input 16 bits
Note: When the input/output setting is switched as described above, CH4 of DJMNXS cannot be used for output.

shoppingdowntown.uson of Audio MIDI Aggregate Device (For Mac)

Step1. From the Finder, open [Application] > [Utility] and click [Audio MIDI Setting].

Step2. Click the [+] button at the left bottom in the [Audio Devices] window and select [Create Aggregate Device].

Step3. Tick the checkbox of [DJM] and [DJM output].

Step4. Change the name from [Aggregate Device] to [DJM_input/output]. Enter the name exactly as is.(Caution: the device will not work if the name is entered differently).

Step5. Open [Preferences] > [Audio] > [Audio] and select [DJM_input/output].

shoppingdowntown.us#faq-q

Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]

Computer music

"Computer Music" redirects here. For the magazine, see Computer Music (magazine).

Computer music is the application of computing technology in music composition, to help human composers create new music or to have computers independently create music, such as with algorithmic composition programs. It includes the theory and application of new and existing computer software technologies and basic aspects of music, such as sound synthesis, digital signal processing, sound design, sonic diffusion, acoustics, electrical engineering and psychoacoustics. The field of computer music can trace its roots back to the origins of electronic music, and the first experiments and innovations with electronic instruments at the turn of the 20th century.

History[edit]

See also: Computer music programming languages

Much of the work on computer music has drawn on the relationship between music and mathematics, a relationship which has been noted since the Ancient Greeks described the "harmony of the spheres".

Musical melodies were first generated by the computer originally named the CSIR Mark 1 (later renamed CSIRAC) in Australia in There were newspaper reports from America and England (early and recently) that computers may have played music earlier, but thorough research has debunked these stories as there is no evidence to support the newspaper reports (some of which were obviously speculative). Research has shown that people speculated about computers playing music, possibly because computers would make noises,[1] but there is no evidence that they actually did it.[2][3]

The world's first computer to play music was the CSIR Mark 1 (later named CSIRAC), which was designed and built by Trevor Pearcey and Maston Beard from the late s. Mathematician Geoff Hill programmed the CSIR Mark 1 to play popular musical melodies from the very early s. In the CSIR Mark 1 was used to play music, the first known use of a digital computer for the purpose. The music was never recorded, but it has been accurately reconstructed.[4][5] In it publicly played the "Colonel Bogey March"[6] of which only the reconstruction exists. However, the CSIR Mark 1 played standard repertoire and was not used to extend musical thinking or composition practice, as Max Mathews did, which is current computer-music practice.

The first music to be performed in England was a performance of the British National Anthem that was programmed by Christopher Strachey on the Ferranti Mark 1, late in Later that year, short extracts of three pieces were recorded there by a BBC outside broadcasting unit: the National Anthem, "Ba, Ba Black Sheep, and "In the Mood" and this is recognised as the earliest recording of a computer to play music as the CSIRAC music was never recorded. This recording can be heard at the this Manchester University site. Researchers at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch declicked and restored this recording in and the results may be heard on SoundCloud.[7][8][9]

Two further major s developments were the origins of digital sound synthesis by computer, and of algorithmic composition programs beyond rote playback. Max Mathews at Bell Laboratories developed the influential MUSIC I program and its descendants, further popularising computer music through a article in Science.[10] Amongst other pioneers, the musical chemists Lejaren Hiller and Leonard Isaacson worked on a series of algorithmic composition experiments from , manifested in the premiere of the Illiac Suite for string quartet.[11]

In Japan, experiments in computer music date back to , when Keio University professor Sekine and Toshiba engineer Hayashi experimented with the TOSBAC&#;[jp] computer. This resulted in a piece entitled TOSBAC Suite, influenced by the Illiac Suite. Later Japanese computer music compositions include a piece by Kenjiro Ezaki presented during Osaka Expo '70 and "Panoramic Sonore" () by music critic Akimichi Takeda. Ezaki also published an article called "Contemporary Music and Computers" in Since then, Japanese research in computer music has largely been carried out for commercial purposes in popular music, though some of the more serious Japanese musicians used large computer systems such as the Fairlight in the s.[12]

The programming computer for Yamaha's first FM synthesizer GS1. CCRMA, Stanford University

Early computer-music programs typically did not run in real time, although the first experiments on CSIRAC and the Ferranti Mark 1 did operate in real time. From the late s, with increasingly sophisticated programming, programs would run for hours or days, on multimillion-dollar computers, to generate a few minutes of music.[13][14] One way around this was to use a 'hybrid system' of digital control of an analog synthesiser and early examples of this were Max Mathews' GROOVE system () and also MUSYS by Peter Zinovieff ().

Until now partial use has been exploited for musical research into the substance and form of sound (convincing examples are those of Hiller and Isaacson in Urbana, Illinois USA; Iannis Xenakis in Paris and Pietro Grossi in Florence, Italy).

In May the first experiments in computer music in Italy were carried out by the S 2F M studio in Florence[15] in collaboration with General Electric Information Systems Italy. [16]Olivetti-General Electric GE (Olivetti S.p.A.) is used by Grossi as a performer: three programmes were prepared for these experiments. The programmes were written by Ferruccio Zulian [17]and used by Pietro Grossi for playing Bach, Paganini, and Webern works and for studying new sound structures.[18]

In the late s these systems became commercialised, notably by systems like the Roland MC-8 Microcomposer, where a microprocessor-based system controls an analog synthesizer, released in [12]John Chowning's work on FM synthesis from the s to the s allowed much more efficient digital synthesis,[19] eventually leading to the development of the affordable FM synthesis-based Yamaha DX7digital synthesizer, released in [20] In addition to the Yamaha DX7, the advent of inexpensive digital chips and microcomputers opened the door to real-time generation of computer music.[20] In the s, Japanese personal computers such as the NEC PC came installed with FM synthesis sound chips and featured audio programming languages such as Music Macro Language (MML) and MIDI interfaces, which were most often used to produce video game music, or chiptunes.[12] By the early s, the performance of microprocessor-based computers reached the point that real-time generation of computer music using more general programs and algorithms became possible.[21]

Interesting sounds must have a fluidity and changeability that allows them to remain fresh to the ear. In computer music this subtle ingredient is bought at a high computational cost, both in terms of the number of items requiring detail in a score and in the amount of interpretive work the instruments must produce to realize this detail in sound.[22]

Advances[edit]

Advances in computing power and software for manipulation of digital media have dramatically affected the way computer music is generated and performed. Current-generation micro-computers are powerful enough to perform very sophisticated audio synthesis using a wide variety of algorithms and approaches. Computer music systems and approaches are now ubiquitous, and so firmly embedded in the process of creating music that we hardly give them a second thought: computer-based synthesizers, digital mixers, and effects units have become so commonplace that use of digital rather than analog technology to create and record music is the norm, rather than the exception.[23]

Research[edit]

Despite the ubiquity of computer music in contemporary culture, there is considerable activity in the field of computer music,[clarification needed] as researchers continue to pursue new and interesting computer-based synthesis, composition, and performance approaches. Throughout the world there are many organizations and institutions dedicated to the area of computer and electronic music study and research, including the ICMA (International Computer Music Association), C4DM (Centre for Digital Music), IRCAM, GRAME, SEAMUS (Society for Electro Acoustic Music in the United States), CEC (Canadian Electroacoustic Community), and a great number of institutions of higher learning around the world.

Music composed and performed by computers[edit]

Main article: Algorithmic composition

See also: Generative music, Evolutionary music, and Genetic algorithm

Later, composers such as Gottfried Michael Koenig and Iannis Xenakis had computers generate the sounds of the composition as well as the score. Koenig produced algorithmic composition programs which were a generalisation of his own serial composition practice. This is not exactly similar to Xenakis' work as he used mathematical abstractions and examined how far he could explore these musically. Koenig's software translated the calculation of mathematical equations into codes which represented musical notation. This could be converted into musical notation by hand and then performed by human players. His programs Project 1 and Project 2 are examples of this kind of software. Later, he extended the same kind of principles into the realm of synthesis, enabling the computer to produce the sound directly. SSP is an example of a program which performs this kind of function. All of these programs were produced by Koenig at the Institute of Sonology in Utrecht in the s.[24] In the s, Andranik Tangian developed a computer algorithm to determine the time event structures for rhythmic canons and rhythmic fugues, which were then "manually" worked out into harmonic compositions Eine kleine Mathmusik I and Eine kleine Mathmusik II performed by computer;[25][26] for scores and recordings see.[27]

Computer-generated scores for performance by human players[edit]

Computers have also been used in an attempt to imitate the music of great composers of the past, such as Mozart. A present exponent of this technique is David Cope, whose computer programs analyse works of other composers to produce new works in a similar style. Cope's best-known program is Emily Howell.[28][29][30]

Melomics, a research project from the University of Málaga (Spain), developed a computer composition cluster named Iamus, which composes complex, multi-instrument pieces for editing and performance. Since its inception, Iamus has composed a full album in , appropriately named Iamus, which New Scientist described as "The first major work composed by a computer and performed by a full orchestra."[31] The group has also developed an API for developers to utilize the technology, and makes its music available on its website.

Computer-aided algorithmic composition[edit]

Diagram illustrating the position of CAAC in relation to other Generative musicSystems

Computer-aided algorithmic composition (CAAC, pronounced "sea-ack") is the implementation and use of algorithmic composition techniques in software. This label is derived from the combination of two labels, each too vague for continued use. The label computer-aided composition lacks the specificity of using generative algorithms. Music produced with notation or sequencing software could easily be considered computer-aided composition. The label algorithmic composition is likewise too broad, particularly in that it does not specify the use of a computer. The term computer-aided, rather than computer-assisted, is used in the same manner as computer-aided design.[32]

Machine improvisation[edit]

See also: Machine learning, Machine listening, Music and artificial intelligence, and Computer models of musical creativity

Machine improvisation uses computer algorithms to create improvisation on existing music materials. This is usually done by sophisticated recombination of musical phrases extracted from existing music, either live or pre-recorded. In order to achieve credible improvisation in particular style, machine improvisation uses machine learning and pattern matching algorithms to analyze existing musical examples. The resulting patterns are then used to create new variations "in the style" of the original music, developing a notion of stylistic reinjection. This is different from other improvisation methods with computers that use algorithmic composition to generate new music without performing analysis of existing music examples.[33]

Statistical style modeling[edit]

Style modeling implies building a computational representation of the musical surface that captures important stylistic features from data. Statistical approaches are used to capture the redundancies in terms of pattern dictionaries or repetitions, which are later recombined to generate new musical data. Style mixing can be realized by analysis of a database containing multiple musical examples in different styles. Machine Improvisation builds upon a long musical tradition of statistical modeling that began with Hiller and Isaacson's Illiac Suite for String Quartet () and Xenakis' uses of Markov chains and stochastic processes. Modern methods include the use of lossless data compression for incremental parsing, prediction suffix tree, string searching and more.[34] Style mixing is possible by blending models derived from several musical sources, with the first style mixing done by S. Dubnov in a piece NTrope Suite using Jensen-Shannon joint source model.[35] Later the use of factor oracle algorithm (basically a factor oracle is a finite state automaton constructed in linear time and space in an incremental fashion)[36] was adopted for music by Assayag and Dubnov[37] and became the basis for several systems that use stylistic re-injection.[38]

Implementations[edit]

The first implementation of statistical style modeling was the LZify method in Open Music,[39] followed by the Continuator system that implemented interactive machine improvisation that interpreted the LZ incremental parsing in terms of Markov models and used it for real time style modeling[40] developed by François Pachet at Sony CSL Paris in [41][42] Matlab implementation of the Factor Oracle machine improvisation can be found as part of Computer Audition toolbox. There is also an NTCC implementation of the Factor Oracle machine improvisation.[43]

OMax is a software environment developed in IRCAM. OMax uses OpenMusic and Max. It is based on researches on stylistic modeling carried out by Gerard Assayag and Shlomo Dubnov and on researches on improvisation with the computer by G. Assayag, M. Chemillier and G. Bloch (a.k.a. the OMax Brothers) in the Ircam Music Representations group.[44] One of the problems in modeling audio signals with factor oracle is the symbolization of features from continuous values to a discrete alphabet. This problem was solved in the Variable Markov Oracle (VMO) available as python implementation,[45] using an information rate criteria for finding the optimal or most informative representation.[46]

Live coding[edit]

Main article: Live coding

Live coding[47] (sometimes known as 'interactive programming', 'on-the-fly programming',[48] 'just in time programming') is the name given to the process of writing software in realtime as part of a performance. Recently it has been explored as a more rigorous alternative to laptop musicians who, live coders often feel, lack the charisma and pizzazz of musicians performing live.[49]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Algorhythmic Listening – Auditory Practices of Early Mainframe Computing". AISB/IACAP World Congress . Archived from the original on 7 November Retrieved 18 October
  2. ^Doornbusch, Paul (9 July ). "MuSA – Early Computer Music Experiments in Australia, England and the USA". MuSA Conference. Retrieved 18 October
  3. ^Doornbusch, Paul (). "Early Computer Music Experiments in Australia and England". Organised Sound. Cambridge University Press. 22 (2): – [11]. doi/S
  4. ^Fildes, Jonathan (17 June ). "Oldest computer music unveiled". BBC News Online. Retrieved 18 June
  5. ^Doornbusch, Paul (March ). "Computer Sound Synthesis in The Music of CSIRAC". Computer Music Journal. 28 (1): 11– doi/ ISSN&#; S2CID&#;
  6. ^Doornbusch, Paul. "The Music of CSIRAC". Melbourne School of Engineering, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering. Archived from the original on 18 January
  7. ^"First recording of computer-generated music – created by Alan Turing – restored". The Guardian. 26 September Retrieved 28 August
  8. ^"Restoring the first recording of computer music – Sound and vision blog". British Library. 13 September Retrieved 28 August
  9. ^Fildes, Jonathan (17 June ). "'Oldest' computer music unveiled". BBC News. Retrieved 4 December
  10. ^Bogdanov, Vladimir (). All Music Guide to Electronica: The Definitive Guide to Electronic Music. Backbeat Books. p.&#; ISBN&#;. Retrieved 4 December
  11. ^Lejaren Hiller and Leonard Isaacson, Experimental Music: Composition with an Electronic Computer (New York: McGraw-Hill, ; reprinted Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, ). ISBN&#;[page&#;needed]
  12. ^ abcShimazu, Takehito (). "The History of Electronic and Computer Music in Japan: Significant Composers and Their Works". Leonardo Music Journal. MIT Press. 4: – []. doi/ JSTOR&#; S2CID&#; Retrieved 9 July
  13. ^Cattermole, Tannith (9 May ). "Farseeing inventor pioneered computer music". Gizmag. Retrieved 28 October
    "In the MUSIC program allowed an IBM mainframe computer to play a second composition by Mathews. Back then computers were ponderous, so synthesis would take an hour."
  14. ^Mathews, Max (1 November ). "The Digital Computer as a Musical Instrument". Science. (): – BibcodeSciM. doi/science PMID&#;
    "The generation of sound signals requires very high sampling rates A high speed machine such as the I.B.M. can compute only about numbers per second when generating a reasonably complex sound."
  15. ^"Pietro Grossi's Experience in Electronic and Computer Music by Giuditta Parolini".
  16. ^Kenneth Gaburo. "Reflections on Pietro Grossi's Paganini Al Computer".
  17. ^"Music without Musicians but with Scientists Technicians and Computer Companies".
  18. ^Francesco Giomi. "The Work of Italian Artist Pietro Grossi: From Early Electronic Music to Computer Art".
  19. ^Dean, R. T. (). The Oxford handbook of computer music. Oxford University Press. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  20. ^ abDean, R. T. (). The Oxford handbook of computer music. Oxford University Press. p.&#;1. ISBN&#;.
  21. ^Dean, R. T. (). The Oxford handbook of computer music. Oxford University Press. pp.&#;4–5. ISBN&#;.
    " by the 90s digital sound manipulation (using MSP or many other platforms) became widespread, fluent and stable."
  22. ^Loy, D. Gareth (). "Notes on the implementation of MUSBOX". In Roads, Curtis (ed.). The Music Machine: Selected Readings from Computer Music Journal. MIT Press. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  23. ^Doornbusch, Paul (). "Chapter 3: Early Hardware and Early Ideas in Computer Music: Their Development and Their Current Forms". In Dean, R. T. (ed.). The Oxford handbook of computer music. Oxford University Press. pp.&#;44– doi/oxfordhb/ ISBN&#;.
  24. ^Berg, P (). "Abstracting the future: The Search for Musical Constructs". Computer Music Journal. MIT Press. 20 (3): 24–27 [11]. doi/ JSTOR&#;
  25. ^Tangian, Andranik (). "Constructing rhythmic canons"(PDF). Perspectives of New Music. 41 (2): 64– Retrieved 16 January
  26. ^Tangian, Andranik (). "Constructing rhythmic fugues (unpublished addendum to Constructing rhythmic canons)". IRCAM, Seminaire MaMuX, 9 February , Mosaïques et pavages dans la musique(PDF). Retrieved 16 January
  27. ^Tangian, Andranik (–). "Eine kleine Mathmusik I and II". IRCAM, Seminaire MaMuX, 9 February , Mosaïques et pavages dans la musique. Retrieved 16 January
  28. ^Leach, Ben (22 October ). "Emily Howell: the computer program that composes classical music". Daily Telegraph. ISSN&#; Retrieved 6 October
  29. ^Cheng, Jacqui (30 September ). "Virtual Composer Makes Beautiful Music and Stirs Controversy". Ars Technica.
  30. ^Ball, Philip (1 July ). "Iamus, classical music's computer composer, live from Malaga". The Guardian. Retrieved 15 November
  31. ^"Computer composer honours Turing's centenary". New Scientist. 5 July
  32. ^Christopher Ariza: An Open Design for Computer-Aided Algorithmic Music Composition, Universal-Publishers Boca Raton, Florida, , p. 5
  33. ^Mauricio Toro, Carlos Agon, Camilo Rueda, Gerard Assayag. "GELISP: A Framework to Represent Musical Constraint Satisfaction Problems and Search Strategies", Journal of Theoretical and Applied Information Technology 86, no. 2 (): –
  34. ^S. Dubnov, G. Assayag, O. Lartillot, G. Bejerano, "Using Machine-Learning Methods for Musical Style Modeling", IEEE Computers, 36 (10), pp. 73–80, Oct.
  35. ^DUBNOV, S. (). Stylistic randomness: About composing NTrope Suite. Organised Sound, 4(2), 87– doi/S
  36. ^Jan Pavelka; Gerard Tel; Miroslav Bartosek, eds. (). Factor oracle: a new structure for pattern matching; Proceedings of SOFSEM'99; Theory and Practice of Informatics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. pp.&#;– ISBN&#;. Retrieved 4 December
  37. ^Using factor oracles for machine improvisation G Assayag, S Dubnov Soft Computing 8 (9), –
  38. ^Memex and composer duets: computer-aided composition using style mixing S Dubnov, G Assayag Open Music composers book 2, 53–66
  39. ^G. Assayag, S. Dubnov, O. Delerue, "Guessing the Composer's Mind&#;: Applying Universal Prediction to Musical Style", In Proceedings of International Computer Music Conference, Beijing,
  40. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1 November Retrieved 19 May CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  41. ^Pachet, F., The Continuator: Musical Interaction with StyleArchived 14 April at the Wayback Machine. In ICMA, editor, Proceedings of ICMC, pages –, Göteborg, Sweden, September ICMA. Best paper award.
  42. ^Pachet, F. Playing with Virtual Musicians: the Continuator in practiceArchived 14 April at the Wayback Machine. IEEE Multimedia,9(3)–82
  43. ^ M Toro, C Rueda, C Agón, G Assayag. NTCCRT: A concurrent constraint framework for soft-real time music interaction. Journal of Theoretical & Applied Information Technology Vol. 82 Issue 1, p
  44. ^"The OMax Project Page". shoppingdowntown.us. Retrieved 2 February
  45. ^Guided music synthesis with variable markov oracle C Wang, S Dubnov,, Tenth Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference,
  46. ^S Dubnov, G Assayag, A Cont, Audio oracle analysis of musical information rate IEEE Fifth International Conference on Semantic Computing, –57,
  47. ^Collins, N.; McLean, A.; Rohrhuber, J.; Ward, A. (). "Live coding in laptop performance". Organised Sound. 8 (3): – doi/SX.
  48. ^Wang G. & Cook P. () "On-the-fly Programming: Using Code as an Expressive Musical Instrument", In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) (New York: NIME, ).
  49. ^Collins, N. (). "Generative Music and Laptop Performance". Contemporary Music Review. 22 (4): 67– doi/ S2CID&#;

Further reading[edit]

  • Ariza, C. "Navigating the Landscape of Computer-Aided Algorithmic Composition Systems: A Definition, Seven Descriptors, and a Lexicon of Systems and Research." In Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference. San Francisco: International Computer Music Association. –
  • Ariza, C. An Open Design for Computer-Aided Algorithmic Music Composition: athenaCL. PhD Dissertation, New York University.
  • Berg, Paul (). "Abstracting the Future: The Search for Musical Constructs". Computer Music Journal. 20 (3): 24– doi/ JSTOR&#;
  • Boulanger, Richard, ed. (6 March ). The Csound Book: Perspectives in Software Synthesis, Sound Design, Signal Processing, and Programming. The MIT Press. p.&#; ISBN&#;. Archived from the original on 2 January Retrieved 3 October
  • Chadabe, Joel. Electric Sound: The Past and Promise of Electronic Music. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  • Chowning, John. "The Synthesis of Complex Audio Spectra by Means of Frequency Modulation". Journal of the Audio Engineering Society 21, no. –
  • Collins, Nick (). Introduction to Computer Music. Chichester: Wiley. ISBN&#;.
  • Dodge, Charles; Jerse (). Computer Music: Synthesis, Composition and Performance. Thomas A. (2nd&#;ed.). New York: Schirmer Books. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  • Doornbusch, P. "A Chronology / History of Electronic and Computer Music and Related Events - "
  • Doornbusch, P. "MuSA – Early Computer Music Experiments in Australia, England and the USA"
  • Heifetz, Robin (). On the Wires of Our Nerves. Lewisburg Pa.: Bucknell University Press. ISBN&#;.
  • D. Herremans; C.H. Chuan; E. Chew (). "A Functional Taxonomy of Music Generation Systems". ACM Computing Surveys. 50 (5): – arXiv doi/TAFFC S2CID&#;
  • Manning, Peter (). Electronic and Computer Music (revised and expanded&#;ed.). Oxford Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press. ISBN&#;.
  • Perry, Mark, and Thomas Margoni. "From Music Tracks to Google Maps: Who Owns Computer-Generated Works?". Computer Law and Security Review
  • Roads, Curtis (). The Computer Music Tutorial. Cambridge: MIT Press. ISBN&#;.
  • Supper, Martin (). "A Few Remarks on Algorithmic Composition". Computer Music Journal. 25: 48– doi/ S2CID&#;
  • Xenakis, Iannis (). Formalized Music: Thought and Mathematics in Composition. Harmonologia Series No. 6. Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Pr. ISBN&#;.
Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]

We&#;re going to take a look at the best desktop computers for music production and recording. We have a separate article specifically highlighting the best laptops for music production if you want something portable.

Did you know that processing audio is one of the most CPU-intensive tasks that people do on computers today?

When processing audio, most signal and effect chains have to happen sequentially. Basically what that means is that you want a processor (CPU) with fast single core performance. DAWs still take advance of multiple cores (i.e. Intel Quad Core) though. 8th generation Intel i7 processors are the best, but 7th gen versions aren&#;t far behind.

As for RAM, don&#;t go less than 8GB. I highly recommend getting configurations with at least 16GB though.

For the most part, these will be Windows-based PC&#;s, but there will be a couple great options from Apple.

Keep in mind that the better the specs you get now, the longer your computer will last. Think of getting a desktop or all-in-one computer as an investment.

All-In-One Desktop Computers

All-In-One computers look great and save space, but the downside is that they tend to use laptop-like components to save space and keep heat production down.

Apple iMac

If I was getting a new Apple computer for music production in , I would get the 5K 27&#; iMac.

Because they made the RAM easily upgradeable on the 5K model (it will take 2 minutes &#; it&#;s like plugging in a power cord), I would get the lower 8GB configuration and purchase this 16GB or 32GB RAM kit separately.

In fact, if you look at the &#;frequently bought together&#; section on Amazon, you will see that is exactly what a lot of people do &#; and that&#;s what I just did as well a few months ago too!

You get plenty of I/O with 2 Thunderbolt 3 ports (USB C), 4 USB ports, SD Card Reader, Wi-FI, and a headphone jack.

The screen is amazing and buying a similar quality option separately would cost you around $1,&#; just for the monitor. Highly recommended.

Check Current Price On Amazon

HP ENVY All-in-One Computer

These computers are killer deals and have the perfect specs for audio production.

27&#; All-in-One

There is a 27&#; model with an iT, 16GB DDR4 SDRAM, and 2 hard drives: 1TB RPM HDD and GB SSD.

The touchscreen has an IPS display for great viewing angles. You get 4 USB ports, HDMI in and out, Thunderbolt 3, Ethernet, Wi-FI, Bluetooth , an SD card reader, and a headphone jack. There is also a GeForce GTX M graphics card with 4GB VRAM.

You can also upgrade to a GB SSD version.

What is there not to like for around $?

Check Current Price On Amazon

34&#; Curved

Want a bigger screen? This thing is awesome. I think the 34&#; model with iT, AMD Radeon RX , 16GB DDR RAM, GB SSD, and 1TB HDD is plenty, but you can always get this version with 32GB RAM as well.

Note that this version doesn&#;t have a touchscreen, but it is extremely quiet (a huge plus for music production and recording) and will give you plenty of desktop space to work.

The ports on the 34&#; model are the same as the 27&#;: There is HDMI in and out, 4 USB , 1 USB-C Thunderbolt 3, Gigabit Ethernet, 3-in-1 card reader, and headphone/mic combo jack.

Check Current Price On Amazon

Dell XPS AIO

The Dell XPS has a 27&#; touchscreen 4K monitor, Intel iK CPU, 16GB DDR4 RAM, GB SSD, and an AMD Radeon RX w/ 8GB GDDR5 memory. These are desktop-class components, not mobile versions.

It has 4x USB ports, 2x USB Type-C, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, an HDMI port, and a card reader. You can see the impressive speaker lineup built-in, but you will likely have your own studio monitors, so not sure those add a lot of value.

Either way, this computer is well-equipped and looks gorgeous, but at a cost.

Check Current Price On Amazon

Tower PCs

There are tons of choices for &#;tower&#; PCs for your audio recording and editing studio. I&#;m just going to highlight a selection of well-known brands with specs that will perform well at a reasonable price. The benefit of tower computers is that you tend to get the best performance for the price.

These usually don&#;t come with a monitor so you will need to keep that in mind when choosing one.

Dell XPS

For around $1,, the Dell XPS has everything you&#;ll need to run your favorite DAW at full speed:

  • Intel i CPU (8th Gen)
  • 16GB DDR4 RAM
  • NVIDIA GTX Ti
  • GB SSD + 2TB HDD

For connectivity, you get 7 USB ports, USB port, 2 USB ports, HDMI, Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, DVD Burner, and a card reader. Plenty for your USB Interface (and anything else).

This tower is is what I&#;d call a &#;sleeper&#; &#; it looks plain from the outside, but it has some impressive hardware on the inside!

Don&#;t forget to grab a monitor too.

Check Current Price On Amazon

HP Envy

Priced a little higher, but with awesome specs, the HP Envy comes with an i GHz CPU, NVidia GeForce GTX (3GB GDDR5 VRAM), 16GB DDR4 RAM, and a 1 TB RPM HDD + GB SSD. This is a killer setup &#; and is excellent for audio editing.

I/O includes 4x USB , 1x USB Type-C, DVI, HDMI, 3x DisplayPort, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth , 7-in-1 Card Reader, and DVD Burner. Comes with Windows 10 Home. This should be plenty to hook up a mixer and anything else you might need.

SkyTech Omega

We&#;re going to go up a level here with a recommendation from SkyTech Omega. What I love about this configuration is that it is liquid-cooled, which keeps fans from running full speed and interrupting your recordings.

Specs include Intel iK 6-Core processor, 16GB DDR4 RAM, GB SSD, 2TB HDD, and the NVidia GTX GPU with 8GB RAM!

Just perfect if you ask me. The 2 hard drive combo is the ideal for quick tasks and lots of storage for plugins, samples, and tracks. If you&#;re into gaming (since that&#;s the main target audience for this PC) as well, take a look at these gaming microphones too.

You&#;ll get 4x USB ports, 2x USB , Ethernet, and WiFi.

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Apple iMac Pro

The iMac Pro isn&#;t cheap, but when you consider you get a top of the line 5K monitor included with the package, it doesn&#;t seem so bad.

Base model specs include: GHz 8-core Intel Xeon W processor, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD, and a Radeon Pro Vega 56 GPU.

A friend of mine got one right after they came out and loves it. Just make sure you get all the Space Gray accessories when you first purchase it &#; Apple doesn&#;t sell them separately.

Build Your Own

March Update: Changed CPU & Motherboard to 8th Gen Intel (fastest single-thread performance today)

For those that would like to build a custom computer, I thought I would throw in a recommendation on what I would get as of March I&#;ve built 5 or 6 computers for friends and myself over the years, and find it kind of fun to put together.

Like I mentioned up top, you will want to skew your budget toward CPU power (if you have to) when custom-building a computer for music production.

You can easily get away with a less powerful graphics card (GPU) here to save a little &#; and you can always add more hard drives over time as you need them. The motherboard comes with Wi-Fi so you should be covered there as well.

Let me know what you think!

Categories ComputersИсточник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
UK

HP Envy

Another nice PC laptop for music

Considering when we first started making music it was on an HP laptop (and it lasted us about years until we upgraded), we have some first-hand experience when it comes to overall build and stability with HP laptops, especially for making music. Back in the day, it wasn’t the fastest (and we’d recommend a PC if you’re going to be in a home studio a majority of the time), but nowadays, RAM is typically in the 8GB range and processors are continuing to improve in laptops. Check out the HP Envy if you want a laptop that isn’t Mac.

Check pricing\reviews of the Envy: US UK

Apple MacBook Air

Another Mac laptop option

If you’re into small-sized laptops that are a little more expensive because of it, here’s another option if you want a Mac device. This is great for those performing on stage or traveling to gigs\practices with a group or band. Although we’d still recommend a Macbook Pro, Category: PC Music Setup, Category: PC Music Setup is another option to include here at the end of the list. We know people who just have different preferences than other; and this may be Category: PC Music Setup one for you. The price does get costly, but it may be worth it for your needs.

View pricing of the MacBook Air: US UK

Apple iMac

The best Mac computer for music production

If you’re planning on being a “studio only” producer (whether you’re home, Category: PC Music Setup, semi or even professional), here’s the best Mac computer to buy. If you grab this, you can use their Mac-specific DAWs, such as Logic, Garageband, and of course Pro Tools. Even if you don’t plan on using Pro Tools right away, you can always upgrade in a few years (we think this will last you at least 5+ years if you purchase a model with a decent specification list). So don’t forget to keep the future (long-term of course) in mind when investing in a computer for music production, considering it’s what holds the entire setup together. If you want a Mac, grab either this or the laptop we first presented and don’t look back, we wouldn’t bother reading on.

Check price of Apple iMac: US

How to Choose a Music Production Computer

A music production computer is your first step toward building your own home studio.

Good computers for audio production have never been more accessible.

In fact, if you&#;re reading this article on your laptop or desktop, your machine probably has plenty of power to get started with music.

But if you don&#;t even know where to begin, Category: PC Music Setup, choosing the right computer is difficult.

If you’re buying or building a rig specifically for music there are some important factors to consider to get the best laptop or desktop computer for audio production.

In this article I’ll lay out everything you need to know to choose the right computer for your home studio.

Computer components

To understand this article you’ll need a little background in computer components. Your music computer is only as good as the sum of its parts.

Your music computer is only as good as the sum of its parts.

Those parts have different specifications that result in different performance in your system.

The most important computer specifications for music production are:

  • CPU speed and number of cores
  • Memory (RAM)
  • Storage (SSD or HDD)

I’ll walk you through each one in detail.

CPU

CPU stands for central processing unit.

CPU

It’s the component where the fundamental operations of your computer take place.

CPU performance is measured by clock speed and number Category: PC Music Setup cores.

Higher clock speed means faster overall pace of the calculations performed by the CPU.

But additional cores are also important. More CPU cores allow for better performance in applications that support multi-threading.

All major DAWs take advantage of multi-threading, but single-threaded performance is still important for audio.

All major DAWs take advantage of multi-threading, but single-threaded performance is still important for audio.

The bottom line is that when it comes to your CPU, the best advice is the get the processor with the most cores and the highest clock speed you can afford.

At minimum you should be looking for a processor with at least two cores and clock speed no lower than GHz.

Memory

Memory refers to your computer’s RAM specification.

RAM means random access memory. It’s the extremely fast working memory your computer uses to store information it needs right away.

In the early days of computing, RAM was extremely expensive.

But today’s computer parts are much more economical. It’s common to see RAM configurations of up to 64 GB and beyond in high-end builds.

Increasing the amount of RAM available in your system will increase its performance—up to a point.

Despite how important RAM may seem, audio tasks are surprisingly forgiving on your system’s memory.

Despite how important RAM may seem, audio tasks are surprisingly forgiving on your system’s memory.

8 GB is plenty for the majority of music production processing.

RAM

16 or 32 GB can help if you plan to work with the large sample libraries that are needed to emulate acoustic instruments realistically.

But think twice before you pay steep prices to max out your computer’s RAM.

Storage

Storage refers to your computer’s internal space for saving files and applications.

More is better, but the speed matters as well.

Today’s solid-state drives (SSDs) are considerably faster than conventional hard disks (HDDs).

Using an SSD as the main OS and applications drive makes a big difference to the speed of startup and other read/write intensive tasks.

But if you use one, you’ll likely have to settle for less storage on your system volume—SSDs cost more per GB than HDDs.

SSD vs HDD

Hot tip: In the past it was considered best practice to track your audio files and sessions onto a separate drive.

This has become less of a concern with modern hardware, Category: PC Music Setup, but it’s still a valid way to take some stress off your main system drive.

Consider using a fast external drive for your sessions and audio files.

Mac vs. PC

Before you start looking at specific builds or models you should decide which computing platform is right for you.

Mac and PC are the two main types. There is a dedicated community of Linux audio producers out there, but Linux-based OS is much less common among beginners and professionals when it comes to audio.

Mac vs. PC used to be a big debate in the pro audio community.

Mac vs. PC

Many insist that the stability and smooth workflow of Mac OS is better for production, while others point to the affordability and easy upgrades of PC as a major benefit.

Many insist that the stability and smooth workflow of Mac OS is better for production, while others point to the affordability and easy upgrades of PC as a major benefit.

Today, the two platforms have similar architecture thanks to Intel processors. That means that there’s not much that’s fundamentally different between them.

It also means you can compare the two types directly by looking at the specs Category: PC Music Setup their components side by side.

Mac computers are almost always more expensive for the performance of their parts than their PC competitors.

But Category: PC Music Setup the design, stability and ease of use of the Mac platform are worth it to you, you might be willing to pay a little more.

On the other hand, Category: PC Music Setup, if you’re on a super tight budget, or you simply want the best value for money, a Windows-based PC EditPlus 5.5 Build 3581 Crack be your best choice.

bit operating system

No matter what platform you choose, it’s critical to make sure you use a bit version of the OS for music production.

bit architecture has been around for a while, Category: PC Music Setup, so there’s no excuse at this point. All the major DAWs support it and the performance benefits are considerable.

64 bit

bit applications in a bit environment can address much more of the available memory in your system.

That sounds complicated, but all it means is that the bit OS lets you take advantage of more of your computer’s resources—it’s a no brainer!

Laptop vs. Desktop

The overall strength of the components in your computer is limited by factors like size, Category: PC Music Setup consumption and heat generation.

Desktop computers can accommodate larger components and house power supplies with enough juice to power them—all while dissipating heat more easily with fans and heatsinks.

In comparison, laptop designs have to compromise on these factors to achieve their portability and small size.

laptop vs. desktop

That makes the desktop format the clear choice when speed and power are critical.

But that&#;s not to say that a well-spec&#;d laptop isn&#;t a good choice for music production.

There are plenty of laptops with perfectly good performance for running your DAW and plugins. That&#;s good news if you need the portability to produce music on the go.

Use whichever type suits your workflow, just make sure the base specs are within the acceptable range for music production.

Gaming PC for music production

Many PC brands offer high-end builds specifically optimized to run games at high settings.

Almost all gaming PCs are up to the task for music production, but for most situations they’re a bit over the top.

Almost all gaming PCs are up to the task for music production, but for Category: PC Music Setup situations they’re a bit over the top.

The high-end graphics cards and powerful RAM configurations of most gaming PCs add extra cost that might not translate into better performance for music production.

If you already own a gaming PC you’re all set with a great computer for music. But if not, don’t feel like you need to buy one of these specialized rigs just run your DAW and some plugins.

AMD vs. Intel

AMD and Intel are the main CPU manufacturers. The two brands have been competing against each other for decades.

In the past, AMD was associated with budget builds and offered slightly less performance at a more affordable price.

Today the two companies are mostly neck-and-neck when it comes to performance for music production.

AMD has made a big splash with its Ryzen series of CPUs that perform exceptionally well in multi-threading applications at an impressively low cost.

However, there’s been some debate in the pro audio community concerning their latency behaviour at low buffer sizes in comparison to Intel chips.

There also may be some compatibility issues with AMD CPUs for some specific DAWs, including Pro Tools.

Many users report that Ryzen processors work fine in their system, but Avid’s conservative hardware guides do not officially support them.

Consider an Intel-based machine if you want to maximize compatibility.

Integrated graphics vs. GPU

Many inexpensive laptop and desktop computers bring costs down by using integrated graphics in place of discrete GPUs.

Integrated graphics means that the graphics processor is located on the same chip as the CPU.

Integrated graphics means that the graphics processor is located on the same chip as the CPU.

This can save on space, heat output and overall cost, but the trade-off in performance is considerable.

However, a dedicated GPU isn’t always necessary for recording. The main graphical task your computer has to perform for audio production is rendering the UI of your DAW and plugins.

That&#;s not a big enough challenge to require a high-performance discrete GPU. That said, any amount of strain you can take off your Category: PC Music Setup will increase the amount of tracks, plugins and processes you can run once.

Opt for a discrete GPU if you need to push the limits of your computer, Category: PC Music Setup, but don&#;t worry too much if your system doesn&#;t include one.

Music production center

Buying a computer for music production seems complicated. There’s a lot of different factors to consider.

But the cost of a fast computer has never been lower. You can make great music with almost any decent machine, and that’s encouraging.

Use this explainer to help you choose the perfect music production computer for your setup.

Michael Hahn is an engineer and producer at Autoland and member of the swirling indie rock trio Slight.
Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]

We&#;re going to take a look at the best desktop computers Category: PC Music Setup music production and recording. We have a separate article specifically highlighting the best laptops for music production if you want something portable.

Did you know that processing audio is one of the most CPU-intensive tasks that people do on computers today?

When processing audio, most signal and effect chains have to happen sequentially. Basically what that means is that you want a processor (CPU) with fast single core performance. DAWs still take advance of multiple cores (i.e. Intel Quad Core) though. 8th generation Intel i7 processors are the best, but 7th gen versions aren&#;t far behind.

As for RAM, don&#;t go less than 8GB. I highly recommend getting configurations with at least 16GB though.

For the most part, these will be Windows-based PC&#;s, but there will be a couple great options from Apple.

Keep in mind that the better the specs you get now, the longer your computer will last. Think of getting a desktop or all-in-one computer as an investment.

All-In-One Desktop Computers

All-In-One computers look great and save space, but the downside is that they tend to use laptop-like components to save space and keep heat production down.

Apple iMac

If I was getting a new Apple computer for music production inI would get the 5K 27&#; iMac.

Because they made the RAM easily upgradeable on the 5K model (it will take 2 minutes &#; it&#;s like plugging in a power cord), I would get the lower 8GB configuration and purchase this 16GB or 32GB RAM kit separately.

In fact, if you look at the &#;frequently bought together&#; section on Amazon, you will see that is exactly what a lot of people do &#; and that&#;s what I just did as well a few months ago too!

You get plenty of I/O with 2 Thunderbolt 3 ports (USB C), 4 USB ports, SD Card Reader, Wi-FI, and a headphone jack.

The screen is amazing and buying a similar quality option separately would cost you around $1,&#; just for the monitor. Highly recommended.

Check Current Price On Amazon

HP ENVY All-in-One Computer

These computers are killer deals and have the perfect specs for audio production.

27&#; All-in-One

There is a 27&#; model with an iT, 16GB DDR4 SDRAM, and 2 hard drives: 1TB RPM HDD and GB SSD.

The touchscreen has an IPS display for great viewing angles. You get 4 USB ports, Category: PC Music Setup, HDMI in and out, Thunderbolt 3, Ethernet, Wi-FI, Bluetoothan SD card reader, and a headphone jack. There is also a GeForce GTX M graphics card with 4GB VRAM.

You can also upgrade to a GB SSD version.

What is there not to like for around $?

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34&#; Curved

Want a bigger screen? This thing is awesome. I think the 34&#; model with iT, AMD Radeon RX16GB DDR RAM, GB SSD, and 1TB HDD is plenty, Category: PC Music Setup, but you can always get this version with 32GB RAM as well.

Note that this version doesn&#;t have a touchscreen, Category: PC Music Setup, but it is extremely quiet (a huge plus for music production and recording) and will give you plenty of desktop space to work.

The ports on the 34&#; model are the same as the 27&#;: There is HDMI in and out, 4 USB1 USB-C Thunderbolt 3, Gigabit Ethernet, 3-in-1 card reader, and headphone/mic combo jack.

Check Current Price On Amazon

Dell XPS AIO

The Dell XPS has a 27&#; touchscreen 4K monitor, Intel iK CPU, 16GB DDR4 RAM, GB SSD, and an AMD Radeon RX w/ 8GB GDDR5 memory. These are desktop-class components, not mobile versions.

It has 4x USB ports, 2x USB Type-C, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, an HDMI port, and a card reader. You can Category: PC Music Setup the impressive speaker lineup built-in, Category: PC Music Setup, but you will likely have your own studio monitors, so not sure those add a lot of value.

Either way, this computer is well-equipped and looks gorgeous, but at a cost.

Check Current Price On Amazon

Tower PCs

There are tons of choices for &#;tower&#; PCs for your audio recording and editing studio. I&#;m just going to highlight a selection of well-known brands with specs that will perform well at a reasonable price. The benefit of tower computers is that you tend to get the best performance for the price.

These usually don&#;t come with a monitor so you will need to keep that in mind when choosing one.

Dell XPS

For around $1, the Dell XPS has everything you&#;ll need to run your favorite DAW at full speed:

  • Intel i CPU (8th Gen)
  • 16GB DDR4 RAM
  • NVIDIA GTX Ti
  • GB SSD + 2TB HDD

For connectivity, you get 7 USB ports, USB port, 2 USB ports, HDMI, Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, DVD Burner, and a card reader. Plenty for your USB Interface (and anything else).

This tower is is what I&#;d call a &#;sleeper&#; &#; it looks plain from the outside, but it has some impressive hardware on the inside!

Don&#;t forget to grab a monitor too.

Check Current Price On Amazon

HP Category: PC Music Setup

Priced a little higher, but with awesome specs, Category: PC Music Setup, the HP Envy comes with an i GHz CPU, NVidia GeForce GTX (3GB GDDR5 VRAM), 16GB DDR4 RAM, and a 1 TB RPM HDD + GB SSD. This is a killer setup &#; and is excellent for audio editing.

I/O includes 4x USB1x USB Type-C, DVI, HDMI, 3x DisplayPort, Wi-Fi, BluetoothCategory: PC Music Setup, 7-in-1 Card Reader, and DVD Burner. Comes with Windows 10 Home. This should be plenty to hook up a mixer and anything else you might need.

SkyTech Omega

We&#;re going to go up a level here with a recommendation from SkyTech Omega, Category: PC Music Setup. What I love about this configuration is that it is liquid-cooled, which keeps fans from running full speed and interrupting your recordings.

Specs include Intel iK 6-Core processor, 16GB DDR4 RAM, GB SSD, 2TB HDD, and the NVidia GTX GPU with 8GB RAM!

Just perfect if you ask me. The 2 hard drive combo is the ideal for quick tasks and lots of storage for plugins, samples, and tracks, Category: PC Music Setup. If you&#;re into gaming (since that&#;s the main target audience for this PC) as well, take a look at these gaming microphones too.

You&#;ll get 4x USB ports, 2x USBEthernet, and WiFi.

Check Current Price On Amazon

Apple iMac Pro

The iMac Pro isn&#;t cheap, but when you consider you get a top of the line 5K monitor included with the package, it doesn&#;t seem so bad.

Base model specs include: GHz 8-core Intel Xeon W processor, Category: PC Music Setup, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD, and a Radeon Pro Vega 56 GPU.

A friend of mine got one right after they came out and loves it. Just make sure you get all the Space Gray accessories when you first purchase it &#; Apple doesn&#;t sell them separately.

Build Your Own

March Update: Changed CPU & Motherboard to 8th Gen Intel (fastest single-thread performance today)

For those that would like to build a custom computer, I thought I would throw in a recommendation on what I would get as of March I&#;ve built 5 or 6 computers for friends and myself over the years, and find it kind Category: PC Music Setup fun to put together.

Like I mentioned up top, you will want to skew your budget toward CPU power (if you have to) when custom-building a computer for music production.

You can easily get away with a less powerful graphics card (GPU) here to save a little &#; and you can always add more hard drives over time as you need them. The motherboard comes with Wi-Fi so you should be covered there as well.

Let me know what you think!

Categories ComputersИсточник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
UK

Lenovo ThinkServer

A beast of a PC for music producing

We’ve done a lot of research and talking to our friends who make music for a living, and when it comes to a PC that isn’t Mac, the name Lenovo continued to come up. Although it really doesn’t matter (really, it doesn’t) which brand you grab, there are a few aspects to take into consideration: user reviews, reports on longevity, and stats on the quality of internal parts they use. That’s why we feel as compared to some other PC brands like HP, Acer or Dell (although mentioned later), it’s safe to grab one we’ve analyzed and have used personally. Therefore, this is our (our recommendation) choice for PC for producing music. Lenovo builds tanks, and the word among the internet supports that. Check the link for our favorite.

View Category: PC Music Setup for the Lenovo ThinkServer: US UK

Dell Inspiron

A decent alternative for a music recording PC

We’ve had Dell around our entire lives, and although they had mixed reviews back in the day when it came to quality, the Inspiron has been recommend quite a few times when it comes to overall effectiveness, especially for music considering the specs are up there. If you aren’t a fan of Mac and don’t recognize the Lenovo name, we’d grab this one and check out the reviews for yourself. They have decent user support if you ever need (we suppose is a plus), and it doesn’t hurt to have a brand name you’re familiar with.

Check pricing for the Dell Inspiron: US UK

Acer Predator

A gaming PC but also great for making tunes

Acer considers this a gaming desktop, and although obviously by the video card it is, the processor, RAM and overall quality of the machine works quite well for music making as well. We put this in here because it’s just another option — although the PC’s listed first and more suited (and perhaps a bit cheaper) when it comes to music production (since video cards aren’t necessary with recording or producing), this is a PC to keep in mind while you shop if you indeed plan on perhaps playing games, making videos or other activities on a computer. I mean, it’s not like you’re buying a PC just to make music with (perhaps some of you are), so purchasing a computer that is more of an all-around type may be in your interest.

View price of the Acer Predator: US

Talented: Category: PC Music Setup

Category: PC Music Setup
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