Links to other websites | ICO

Links To Other Web Sites

Links To Other Web Sites

The Internet is full of links that connect websites and specific pages. Chances are, you probably have pages on your website that link out to other relevant. All agency websites, internal and external. Secondary sites can link to the accessibility statement on the domain website. Required by: OMB. mil website is considered an external link. All public websites must meet certain requirements mandated by laws, regulations and policies;.

Links To Other Web Sites - seems

In the online world, content is akin to real estate. When you’re ready to put a house on the market, you stage it with all the bells and whistles. It’s clean, organized, and easy to navigate, providing a clear vision of the lifestyle possible for whoever chooses to buy it.

The same can be said for creating and promoting online content.

Marketers use content as an online draw to build traffic for their web real estate, but links offered within content are part of “home staging.” Without them, content is one-dimensional and fails at its core purpose: to act as a living, breathing, strategic, multi-level traffic generator for a brand or business.

Incorporating a strong link strategy as part of ongoing content development is also important when promoting content on various social channels. As a decentralized marketing tool, brands can leverage diverse content strategies for each channel to promote content that caters to unique buyer personas, simply by pointing them to blog posts with a targeted link strategy written into the content be design.

The truth is, to stand out as an industry leader in a sea of content, it’s essential to use both internal and external links to foster good SEO and content ranking. It spices up the life and usefulness of content initially and in the long term if done well. And Google uses it as one of the top three criteria for content ranking.

To get a closer look at ways to pump up the results of your link building strategy, check out some of these do’s and don’ts.

What Goes Wrong When You Ignore Link Strategy

Once upon a time, people thought packing as many links as possible into blogs and website content was magical. The more links, the better, even if they had no clear relation to the topic of an article or web page. The focus was on getting traffic, even if it wasn’t relevant.

This strategy is still in play, but more deftly disguised as click-bait using relevant keywords as links. But at what cost?

In a competitive online market, quality content is a differentiator. Random links with no apparent purpose are seen as spam or a waste of a reader’s time. This practice confuses people, pumps up bounce rates, and significantly diminishes the quality of the customer experience while tanking a brand’s online cred.

The most significant cost of a poorly planned and organized link strategy is the confusion it creates around the main call to action. Without a clear purpose written directly into content and hyperlinked, potential customers are unsure what to do. So, they bounce. Time, effort, and money that went into creating content in the first place go to waste.

Link Strategy Do’s and Don’ts

According to The Beginner’s Guide to SEO by MOZ, “Links act as the streets between web pages.” When there’s a lot of related content you want to connect without it competing for clicks, links can act as the intermediary, while helping content build value as a network of streets.

Holding this in mind, the way we create the streets—and where we place them in content—becomes important as part of overall content strategy effectiveness.

Blogs are the type of content that changes most frequently on a website. This makes it one of the most effective places to leverage a good link strategy. A consistent blogging practice also connects readers with cornerstone content and topic-specific support, while allowing brands to provide internal and external link strategies to build SEO value organically.

Just be sure to add in these do’s and don’ts tips:

Do: Include a Link Above the Fold

According to Problogger, “Web users spend 80% of their time looking at information ‘above the fold’ or ‘what you see before you scroll.’ ” So, take advantage of it. Feature links towards the top of the page that show recent or best work to keep people looking beyond the one post.

To boost signups for an email list, include a form at the top of the sidebar. However, make sure to leave room for your content to breathe. Don’t try and smash ads and other distracting elements above the fold, making the content itself an afterthought.

Don’t: Overwhelm Your Reader

Less is more, especially when it comes to an effective link building strategy.

If you add multiple links within each paragraph of a blog post, you have definitely gone overboard. Try and stick to three to five inbound and outbound links per 1000 words. It can go a bit higher if you are a content-based site that features research and educational blog posts.

Do: Have a Clear Single CTA

One of the trickier parts of including various links in blog post content is that the call to action gets a bit hazy. With so many alternate routes, the main course of action may get drowned out.

To keep things tight, clear, and moving towards one specific call to action, include links that support the core article topic or add to its depth and credibility. Refrain from “link piling” or trying to use one blog post to do all the work for a marketing campaign.

The better strategy is to write a series of posts to create more real estate and spread out important links while building better SEO and content pathways.

Don’t: Be Afraid to Link to an External Resource

Frequent, well-written blog posts offer Google-friendly opportunities to go beyond inbound links and connect with other credible external sources.

Sharing insights that can be backed up by other well-read websites helps to pave the streets for good SEO, and creates options for referral linking. It’s a credible way to link to a much more popular site, which offers authority and a trust factor for a target audience.

If you repeatedly use quality external resources, you also build authority for the content you created and for the brand site in general.

Do: Experiment with Using Recommended Content CTAs

Brand blogs serve as a great place for potential customers to get a taste of your knowledge and specific ways featured practices or products make life better.

So, instead of packing on the links to push products, services, or deals, why not point links to recommended content as the call to action? Not only does this drive traffic to other great, insightful pieces but it also acts as a gateway to connect readers with newer, fresher pieces of cornerstone content they may not even realize they need. Leveraging CTAs to recommended content also positions a brand as an industry authority.

Don’t: Be Dishonest with Gated Links and Confuse the Reader

When you go to a website and click on a link that sounds perfect for what you need, you expect to get right to the details. There’s nothing more frustrating for a reader than clicking on a link to read more and discovering they need an account and password to continue.

Brands must create a balance of free content and gated content as part of a good business strategy, and they must be clear and upfront about it.

Do: Use an Editorial Calendar to Improve Link Building

Many brands get linking right by using an editorial calendar to plan and create content that aligns with marketing campaign goals. An editorial calendar also serves as a guide to help marketers incorporate related content links in newly created blog content.

Don’t: Forget to Keep Things Fresh

Link signals tend to decay over time, and popular sites can sometimes go stale because they aren’t earning any new links. The freshness of a link is a huge factor in determining its popularity, and it’s also a judgment factor in link relevance.

Don’t forget the freshness factor when putting together blog posts, and stick to reference links that are no more than two years old, depending on the topic of the blog post.

The Simple Truth

A good link strategy is a good growth strategy, plain and simple.

When the content you create for a brand or business goes beyond the basics and considers these do’s and don’ts in link strategy, quality traffic and organic SEO come along as part of work well done.

 

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

I Can't Get My Hyperlink to Work

By Adrian Grahams

Include relevant keywords in a video title to optimize online search results.

Clicking a hyperlink in a document, email message or Web page should automatically launch the computer’s default Web browser and open the linked page or online resource. If the hyperlink doesn’t work correctly, troubleshoot the problem by checking the link address, link format and program settings.

Check the Original Website

Use your Web browser to find the original page with the Uniform Resource Locator address that you used for the link. Websites sometimes delete pages or move them to different locations. Some blogs and websites also generate dynamic URL addresses that aren’t designed for permanent links, so the linked content may have disappeared. In this situation, the site might display a “404 - Not Found” error message in your browser. If you can’t find the correct Web page, try to find its new location by using the site’s search feature or online sitemap.

Check the URL Address

If you typed in the URL address manually rather than copying and pasting the address, you might have missed characters. Even copying and pasting the URL can cause problems if you didn’t highlight the complete address before using the copy command. Compare the original URL with the address you added for the hyperlink. To ensure you capture the correct address, highlight and copy the full URL from your Web browser’s address bar and then replace the faulty hyperlink with the new link.

Domain Structure

Some websites use “http://www” to start a URL, whereas others don’t use the “www” part of the address. If the website is properly configured, this shouldn’t make any difference. However, website configuration glitches can sometimes prevent the linked page from launching if an incorrect prefix is used in the link address. At the same time, check that you have the top-level domain correct; a page on “.org” site won’t open if you incorrectly gave it a “.com” address. Again, this problem can be resolved by copying the correct address from the browser address bar rather than entering the hyperlink URL manually.

Program Settings

Most productivity and information management programs detect and automatically format hyperlinks. On others, you might need to highlight the link text and select the hyperlink option from the right-click menu. Email programs won’t automatically parse hyperlinks if the program has been configured to handle email messages in plain text format only. To make a hyperlink clickable in most email programs or services, such as Microsoft Outlook, Windows Live Mail or Web-based Yahoo Mail, you’ll need to set the default email format as “HTML” or “Rich Text.” Change the default mail format from the application’s Options or Tools menu. In Web browsers, if you've added a new link to a Web page, sometimes refreshing the browser with the "F5" key will display the link. Another consideration is that some software relies on the “http://” prefix to detect and format a hyperlink. If you omitted this prefix, the link might not function.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Adrian Grahams began writing professionally in 1989 after training as a newspaper reporter. His work has been published online and in various newspapers, including "The Cornish Times" and "The Sunday Independent." Grahams specializes in technology and communications. He holds a Bachelor of Science, postgraduate diplomas in journalism and website design and is studying for an MBA.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

A website is made up of of various pieces of information that live in different sections and on different pages within the site itself.

You can also find information relating to that site on pages that are on different websites.

All these sections and pages are linked together in HTML using the attribute.

In this article, we'll look at the term Hyperlink. Then we'll learn about the different ways you can create hyperlinks, what does, and how to appropriately use the attribute to link sections and pages.

What are Hyperlinks?

In HTML, there are various forms of links. In images, there is the attribute to "link" the source of an image.

For stylesheets, there is the tag with the attribute to "link" the source of a stylesheet.

For anchor tags, there is the attribute to "link" the referenced section or page. Anchor links are also called hyperlinks.

When a user follows a hyperlink, they are navigating to that page. Hyperlinks are elements that reference another document, such that when a user clicks on that element, they are directed to the new document.

When to Use Hyperlinks

As stated above, you may want to link various pages (within your website or externally) or sections on your website.

In this article, I'll highlight three ways of creating hyperlinks. These different ways are important to know because they determine the values of the attribute.

Alright, let's look at those three different ways now.

1. When you want to link to sections of a page

You might use this method, for example, when you're creating a page with a table of contents.

In this case, you may not want your readers to have to scroll down to the last section. It would be nice if they could just click on it in the table of contents and the browser would take them there directly.

This type of linking occurs in the same document, and just takes the reader to different sections. We'll learn how to create a hyperlink for this use case when we learn about the attribute.

2. When you want to link to another page within a website

On your site, you might have a home page, about page, services page, and other types of pages. This method helps users navigate from one page to another.

3. When you want to link to external pages

Sometimes, your website may not contain certain information and another website may have it. In such cases, you might want to reference the other website.

To do this, you would create an external hyperlink that navigates the user to the other website.

These are the three major ways of linking pages. Let's now see how the attribute can help you enable them.

How to Use the Attribute

The is an attribute used to reference another document. You can find it on tags and tags.

The attribute is used on anchor tags () to create hyperlinks in websites. The value of the attribute contains the URL which the hyperlink points to. You can use it like this:

However, the URL values can be different depending on what you're pointing to. For the three ways we looked at earlier, let's see how you can use .

1. How to use to link sections within a document

In this case, the value will be the of the element that starts the section. That means we will have something like this:

When the "Go to second section" hyperlink is clicked, the browser scrolls down to the section with the associated . Also the URL in the URL bar of the browser changes.

For example, if the previous URL was , the new URL will be .

2. How to use to link pages within a website

To use this way, you need to understand what Relative URLs and Absolute URLs are.

Relative URLs are short URLs that point to a document on the same website. It's more like, from where you are, how do you get to this other place on the same website?

This is in contrast to Absolute URLs. For these, you aren't concerned with where you currently are – you provide the full details to get to another place like you were starting from the beginning.

For navigations between pages that live on a website, you can use any of these URLs, but Relative URLs are commonly used.

Say you're on the home page, and you want to reference the about page. Here's how to use the attribute to do that:

From the homepage (say ), the above link will navigate to .

There's something worth noting about the slash () before the link. The tells the browser to append the link to the root of the site (which is the domain). So the root is and the link is appended like so: .

If the slash was absent (), the browser would replace the current path with .

For example, if we were currently on , and we had the following links:

"About 1" would navigate to (replacing the current path ) and "About 2" would navigate to

3. How to use to link to pages on another website

Since it's on a different website, there's no way we can use Relative URLs. For this, we need to specify the absolute source of the document we are referencing.

For example, say we're on , and we want to reference , this is how we'd do it with :

If we had only written , the browser would treat it as a page within a website, thereby appending it to .

Conclusion

In this article, we've seen how the attribute allows us to create different types of links. These various links show the different ways that documents/pages can be referenced within a website.



If you read this far, tweet to the author to show them you care. Tweet a thanks

Learn to code for free. freeCodeCamp's open source curriculum has helped more than 40,000 people get jobs as developers. Get started

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Adding hyperlinks to a web page

Creating a hyperlink to another of your pages

  • Select the text you want to be a hyperlink. The text you select should exactly match the name of the page it will link to. This may mean rewriting the text a little. For example instead of typing 'Click here for more information', you should use 'See <name of page> for more information', and select <name of page> as the hyperlink
  • Click the Hyperlink icon
  • When the Create Hyperlink window appears, select the file you want to link to.

Create Hyperlink dialogue box

  • FrontPage lists first all the pages that you have open for editing. This can be a useful feature if you have open a page within a subfolder that you want to link to as it saves you having to open the subfolder in which it is stored. If you want to link to a page within a subfolder of your Web that isn't already open, just double-click on the subfolder from the list and then select the relevant page
  • Click OK

Creating a hyperlink to a page on the internet

  • Open the browser you normally use to access the internet
  • Go to the web address you want to link to - eg www.lse.ac.uk
  • Right-click in the address/ location field and select Copy
  • Switch from the browser back to FrontPage
  • Select the text you want to be the hyperlink
  • Click the Hyperlink icon Create Hyperlink icon
  • When the Create Hyperlink window appears, delete all the text in the URL field ('URL' is another name for the address/ location). You can remove the 'http://' because when you copied the address from the browser, you included that part as well
  • Right-click and select Paste
  • Click OK - the text will now have become a hyperlink

Creating a hyperlink to a bookmark

  • Select the text you want to use as a bookmark
  • Select Insert > Bookmark from the main toolbar

Bookmark dialogue box

  • You'll see that the letter you selected has also become the name of the bookmark. On any page, bookmark names have to be unique but there is also another constraint you should be aware of
  • Our best practice advice is not to have spaces in file or folder names and this advice also applies to bookmark names. The reason is that some browsers don't understand bookmark names that contain spaces and clicking the link won't scroll the page
  • To avoid this problem, either remove all the spaces or separate the words using just hyphens - or underscores _
  • Click OK to create the bookmark. You'll see in FrontPage that the bookmarked text has a broken line beneath it; this doesn't show in the browser
  • At the top of the page, select the text that you want to become a link to a bookmark
  • Click the Hyperlink icon on the main toolbar Create Hyperlink icon
  • The Create Hyperlink window will appear
  • From the bookmark drop-down menu select the bookmark you have just created

Create Hyperlink dialogue box

Checking and fixing links

  • Switch to the Reports view. Drag the Reports toolbar till it docks beneath the formatting drop-down menus if necessary
  • You should see the Site Summary report displayed - if not, select View > Reports > Site Summary
  • Click the Broken Hyperlinks report
    • Note: if you rename a file from within FrontPage as our best practice guidance suggests, FrontPage will automatically fix any links that might be broken as a result
  • Unverified hyperlinks are links to pages outside of your FrontPage Web, either on the LSE Web server or other Internet addresses
  • To validate the unknown links click the Verify Hyperlinks icon (a link with a red tick underneath)
  • When the Verify Hyperlinks window appears, click the Start button
  • FrontPage will now visit each link and report back if there is a page at the address specified. If you look along the status bar at the bottom of the window you should the numbers of broken internal and broken external hyperlinks
  • Right-click the broken hyperlink and select Edit Page. The page will open in the Page view with the broken link already selected
  • Click the Hyperlink icon as before when creating a hyperlink
  • When the Edit Hyperlink icon appears, select the correct page if the link points to one of your web pages or paste the correct address from the browser if the link goes to an address beyond your pages
  • Click OK and save the page

^ Back to top

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

HTML Links: How to create Links to other Web Pages

This article explains how to create a link from one page to another. It also outlines the different types of hyperlinks.

Links, otherwise known as , are defined using the tag — otherwise known as the element.

To create a hyperlink, you use the tag in conjunction with the attribute. The value of the href attribute is the URL, or, location of where the link is pointing to.

Example:

Try it

Hypertext references can use URLS, URLs, or URLs.

absolute

This refers to a URL where the full path is provided. For example:

relative

This refers to a URL where the path, relative to the current location, is provided.

For example, if we want to reference the URL, and our current location is , we would use this:

root relative

This refers to a URL where the path, relative to the domain's root, is provided.

For example, if we want to reference the URL, and the current location is , we could use this:

The forward slash indicates the domain's root. No matter where your file is located, you can always use this method to specify the path, even if you don't know what the domain name will eventually be (as long as you know the full path from the root).

Link Targets

You can nominate whether to open the URL in a new window or the current window. You do this with the attribute. For example, opens the URL in a new window.

The target attribute can have the following possible values:

Opens the URL in a new browser window.
Loads the URL in the current browser window.
Loads the URL into the parent frame (still within the current browser window). This is only applicable when using frames.
Loads the URL in the current browser window, but cancelling out any frames. Therefore, if frames were being used, they aren't any longer.

Example:

Try it

Jump Links

You can make your links "jump" to other sections within the same page (or another page). These used to be called "named anchors", but they're often referred to as jump links, bookmarks, or fragment identifiers.

Here's how to link to the same page:

  1. Add an ID to the Link Target

    Add an ID to the part of the page that you want the user to end up. To do this, use the attribute. The value should be some short descriptive text. The attribute is a commonly used attribute in HTML.

  2. Create the Hyperlink

    Now create the hyperlink (that the user will click on). This is done by using the of the link target, preceded by a hash () symbol:

So these two pieces of code are placed in different parts of the document. Something like this:

Try it

It doesn't have to be the same page. You can use this method to jump to an ID of any page. To do this, simply add the destination URL before the hash () symbol. Example:

Of course, this assumes that there's an ID with that value on the page.

Email Links

You can create a hyperlink to an email address. To do this, use the attribute in your anchor tag.

Example:

Try it

Clicking on this link should result in your default email client opening up with the email address already filled out.

You can go a step further than this. You can auto-complete the subject line for your users, and even the body of the email. You do this appending and parameters to the email address.

Try it

Base href

You can specify a default URL for all links on the page to start with. You do this by placing the tag (in conjunction with the attribute) in the document's .

Example HTML Code:

Try it

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

I Can't Get My Hyperlink to Work

By Adrian Grahams

Include relevant keywords in a video title to optimize online search results.

Clicking a hyperlink in a document, email message or Web page should automatically launch the computer’s default Web browser and open the linked page or online resource. If the hyperlink doesn’t work correctly, troubleshoot the problem by checking the link address, link format and program settings.

Check the Original Website

Use your Web browser to find the original page with the Uniform Resource Locator address that you used for the link. Websites sometimes Links To Other Web Sites pages or move them to different locations. Some blogs and websites also generate dynamic URL addresses that aren’t designed for permanent links, so the linked content may have disappeared. In this situation, the site might display a “404 - Not Found” error message in your browser. If you can’t find the correct Web page, try to find its new location by using the site’s search feature or online sitemap.

Check the URL Address

If you typed in the URL address manually rather than copying and pasting the address, you might have missed characters. Even copying and pasting the URL can cause problems if you Links To Other Web Sites highlight the complete address before using the copy command. Compare the original URL with the address you added for the hyperlink. To ensure you capture the correct address, highlight and copy the full URL from your Web browser’s address bar and then replace the faulty hyperlink with the new link.

Domain Structure

Some websites use “http://www” to start a URL, whereas others don’t use the “www” part of the address, Links To Other Web Sites. If the website is properly configured, this shouldn’t make any difference. However, website configuration glitches can sometimes prevent the linked page from launching if an incorrect prefix is used in the link address. At the same time, check that you have the top-level domain correct; a page on “.org” site won’t open if you incorrectly gave it a “.com” address. Again, this problem can be resolved by copying the correct address from the browser address bar rather than entering the hyperlink URL manually.

Program Settings

Most productivity and information management programs detect and automatically format hyperlinks. On others, you might need to highlight the link text and select the hyperlink option from the right-click menu. Email programs won’t automatically parse hyperlinks if the program has been configured to handle email messages in plain text format only. To make a hyperlink clickable in most email programs or services, such as Microsoft Outlook, Windows Live Mail or Web-based Yahoo Mail, you’ll need to set the default email format as “HTML” or “Rich Text.” Change the default mail format from the application’s Options or Tools menu. In Web browsers, if you've added a new link to a Web page, sometimes refreshing the browser with Links To Other Web Sites "F5" key will display the link. Another consideration is that some software relies on the “http://” prefix to detect and format a hyperlink. If you omitted this prefix, the link might not function.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Adrian Grahams began writing professionally in 1989 after training as a newspaper reporter. His work has been published online and in various newspapers, including "The Cornish Times" and "The Sunday Independent." Grahams specializes in technology and communications. He holds a Bachelor of Science, postgraduate diplomas in journalism and website design and is studying for an MBA.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

A website is made up of of various pieces of information that live in different sections and on different pages within the site itself.

You can also find information relating to that site on pages that are on different websites.

All these sections and pages are linked together in HTML using the attribute.

In this article, we'll look at the term Hyperlink. Then we'll learn about the different ways you can create hyperlinks, what does, and how to appropriately use the attribute to link sections and pages.

What are Hyperlinks?

In HTML, Links To Other Web Sites, there are various forms of links. In images, there is the attribute to "link" the source of an image.

For stylesheets, there is the tag with the attribute to "link" the source of a stylesheet.

For anchor tags, Links To Other Web Sites, there is the attribute to "link" the referenced section or page. Anchor links are also called hyperlinks.

When a user follows a hyperlink, they are navigating to that page. Hyperlinks are elements that reference another document, such that when a user clicks on that element, they are directed to the new document.

When to Use Hyperlinks

As stated above, you may want to link various pages (within your website or externally) or sections on your website.

In this article, I'll highlight three ways of creating hyperlinks. These different ways are important to know because they determine the values of the attribute.

Alright, let's look at those three different ways now.

1. When you want to link to sections of a page

You might use this method, for example, when you're creating a page with a table of contents.

In this case, you may not want your readers to have to scroll down to the last section. It would be nice if they could just click on it in the table of contents and the browser would take them there directly.

This type of linking occurs in the same document, and just takes the reader to different sections. We'll learn how to create a hyperlink for this use case when we learn about the attribute.

2. When you want to link to another page within a website

On your site, you might have a home page, about page, services page, and other types of pages. This method helps users navigate from one page to another.

3. When you want to link to external pages

Sometimes, your website may not contain certain information and another website may have it. In such cases, you might want to reference the other website.

To do this, you would create an external hyperlink that navigates the user to the other website.

These are the three major ways of linking pages. Let's Links To Other Web Sites see how the attribute can help you enable them.

How to Use the Attribute

The is an attribute used to reference another document. You can find it on tags and tags.

The attribute is used on anchor tags () to create hyperlinks in websites. The value of the attribute contains the URL which the hyperlink points to. You can use it like this:

However, the URL values can be different depending on what you're pointing to. For the three ways we looked at earlier, let's see how you can use .

1. How to use to link sections within a document

In this case, the value will be the of the element that starts the section, Links To Other Web Sites. That means we will have something like this:

When the "Go to second section" hyperlink is clicked, Links To Other Web Sites, the browser scrolls down to the section with the associated. Also the URL in the URL bar of the browser changes.

For example, if the previous URL wasthe new URL will be .

2. How to use to link pages within a website

To use this way, you need to understand what Relative URLs and Absolute URLs are.

Relative URLs are short URLs that point to a document on the same website. It's more like, from where you are, how do you get to this other place on the same website?

This is in contrast to Absolute URLs. For these, you aren't concerned with where you currently are – you provide the full details to get to another place like you were starting from the beginning.

For navigations between pages that live on a website, you can use any of these URLs, but Relative URLs are commonly used.

Say you're on the home page, and you want to reference the about page. Here's how to use the attribute to do that:

From the homepage (say ), the above link will navigate to .

There's something worth noting about the slash () before the link. The tells the browser to append the link to the root of the site (which is the domain). So the root is and the link is appended like so: .

If the slash was absent (), the browser would replace the current path with .

For example, if we were currently onand we had the following links:

"About 1" would navigate to (replacing the current path ) and "About 2" would navigate to

3. How to use to link to pages on another website

Since it's on a different website, there's no way we can use Relative URLs. For this, Links To Other Web Sites, we need to specify the absolute source of the document we are referencing.

For example, say we're onand we want to referencethis is how we'd do it with :

If we had only writtenthe browser would treat it as a page within a website, thereby appending it to .

Conclusion

In this article, we've seen how the attribute allows us to create different types of links, Links To Other Web Sites. These various links show the different ways that documents/pages can be referenced within a website.



If you read this far, tweet to the author to show them you care. Tweet a thanks

Learn to code for free, Links To Other Web Sites. freeCodeCamp's open source curriculum has helped more than 40,000 people get jobs as developers. Get started

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
PUBLIC REPORTING AND PERFORMANCE.GOV

210.6 How are agency-specific plans and reports made Links To Other Web Sites to the public on the agency’s website?

To enhance transparency of performance data, all Federal agencies should make information, including prior plans and reports, as easy as possible to locate from the agency’s individual website (e.g., www.usda.gov). Federal Agencies must also provide a hyperlink on Performance.gov to the agency’s public website (e.g., Links To Other Web Sites, https://www.usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/performance) where the agency has published current and past performance plans and reports, Links To Other Web Sites. In adherence to OMB Memorandum M-17-06, agencies must create a prominent link directly to their performance plans and reports from their “About Agency” or “About Us” page, which is directly off of the agency’s homepage.

Agencies may also want to create links from this page to other planning and performance reporting documents, such as the human capital operating plans, information resources management plans, Agency Financial Reports or Performance and Accountability Reports, Congressional Budget Justifications, and other acquisition or capital asset management plans where those other documents are publicly available and relevant to performance on strategic objectives. Agency performance planning and reporting documents available on the agency website should be consistent with Administration policies and not include predecisional information.

When developing performance information for publication, agencies should be open, transparent, and accountable for results of progress against stated performance goals and objectives, publishing information online consistent with the Federal Records Act, privacy and security restrictions, and other applicable law and policy including OMB Circular A-130, Links To Other Web Sites, Managing Information as a Strategic Resource. It is important that agencies communicate relevant, Links To Other Web Sites, reliable, and timely performance information within and outside their organizations to improve performance outcomes and operational efficiency.

Machine-readable. Consistent with the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010, information published through Performance.gov will be made available to the public in a machine-readable format. See section 240 for additional information on an initiative to make agency performance plans and reports ‘machine readable’ with the 2021 Budget and Performance Planning / Reporting cycle.

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Equal Employment

All federal public websites must comply with the existing No Fear Act Notification and Federal Employee Anti-Discrimination and Retaliation of 2002 (No Fear Act) Public Law No. 107-174). Organizations should review the relevant law to ensure that their public websites meet the full range of requirements.

Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • The homepage of your agency’s principal website
Required by:

Link Location, Links To Other Web Sites, Link Name, Search Engines and URLs

Section 1614.703(d) of the interim rule requires an agency to title its posted EEO information Equal Employment Opportunity Data Posted Pursuant to the No Fear Act. This section further requires an agency to prominently place a hyperlink to the data on the homepage of its public Web site. There was some objection both to the location of the hyperlink and its name.

As for the location, agencies argue that their homepages already are well populated with hyperlinks which primarily are mission-specific. Adding another hyperlink, thereby producing crowding, may in fact be counter-productive. Moreover, many people visiting an agency Web site do so through hyperlinks from other non-agency Web sites or search engines that bypass an agency’s homepage. Some agencies allow internet users to compose a personal homepage, which again bypasses the agency’s standard homepage. For these and other reasons, the agencies that commented uniformly were of the opinion that a hyperlink on an agency’s homepage is not the best way to ensure the public’s assess to an agency’s posted EEO data. These agencies therefore suggested that each agency decide itself where to place its EEO data and hyperlinks to that data since each agency best knows where a target audience goes to look for certain information. A number of agencies offered suggestions where the hyperlink would be better placed, Links To Other Web Sites, such as on the “About the Agency” or “Working for the Agency/Employment” pages.

The Commission is concerned that without a uniform hyperlink location members of the public seeking EEO data from more than one agency will have trouble finding the data. If one agency’s hyperlink is on the “About the Agency” page, another’s is on the “Employment Opportunities” page, another’s is on a page entitled “Civil Rights”, and another’s is on the homepage, locating the data for multiple agencies could well end up as an exercise in trial and error. Even assuming that the homepage is not the best or most intuitive location for the hyperlink, EEOC is convinced that it would not be in the public interest to allow each agency to decide where on its Web site it will place the hyperlink. Thus, if not the homepage, EEOC must dictate another uniform location. The problem is that there are no other locations common to all agency public Web sites. Agencies do not label their “About the Agency” and “Employment” pages identically. Not every agency has an Employment Opportunities page. Thus, there is no way to standardize through a rule an alternative location for the link. This leaves only the homepage as the one Web page all agencies possess in common, and therefore it is the homepage which shall house the link.

Regarding the title of the hyperlink, EEOC agrees that it is too wordy. EEOC, however, does not agree that the label “No FEAR” will be widely misunderstood by members of the public. On the contrary, the term “No FEAR Act” has attained familiarity among employees and those involved in EEO matters. Accordingly, the final rule provides that the hyperlink shall be called “No FEAR Act Data&rdquo. However, agencies will be required ableton download crack Archives title the page where its data appears as follows:

“Equal Employment Opportunity Data Posted Pursuant to Title III of the Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 (No FEAR Act), Pub. L. 107-174.”

In furtherance of making every agency’s No FEAR Act data easily accessible, it was suggested that agencies maintain their posted data so that it is readily retrievable by commercial Links To Other Web Sites engines. EEOC agrees and has added a subsection setting forth this requirement.

Finally, some commenters suggested that each agency provide EEOC with the hyperlink to its No FEAR data and that EEOC post the agency hyperlinks in one location on EEOC’s public Web site. EEOC has decided to adopt this suggestion. Therefore, Links To Other Web Sites, the final rule contains the requirement that an agency provide EEOC with the URL for the location of its Links To Other Web Sites FEAR data and provide URL updates as necessary. Agencies can e-mail their URLs to EEOC at NoFEAR.URLS@eeoc.gov.

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External Links

Agencies must clearly identify external links from their websites. Agency websites must clearly state that the content of external links to non-federal agency websites is not endorsed by the federal government and is not subject to federal information quality, privacy, security, and related guidelines.

Any link that is not a federal or website is considered an external link.

Suggested link text:

Agencies should choose the best approach to identify external links to users in a way Links To Other Web Sites minimizes the impact on the usability of their websites and digital services

Required on:
  • Your principal website
  • Any known sub-agency site
  • Any known major entry points to your sites
Required by:

11. Ensure Information Quality and Accuracy

The Internet enables agencies to communicate information quickly and easily to a wide audience, which, while of great benefit to society, also increases the potential harm that can result from disseminating incorrect information. Taking this into account, information disseminated from Federal Government websites and digital services, or from third-party services on behalf of the Dc Unlocker Crack v1.00.1422 + {2 Client} Free Keygen Download Archives, is expected to be authoritative and reliable.

The Information Quality Act applies to all information disseminated from Federal websites, and in certain cases, to information published to third-party sites on behalf of the Government. OMB has published Information Quality Guidelines to help agencies meet this requirement. 26

E. Agencies must clearly identify external links from their websites, and to the extent practicable update or remove the links when the external information is no longer sufficiently accurate, relevant, timely, necessary or complete.

  1. Agency websites must clearly state that the content of external links to non-Federal Agency websites is not endorsed by the Federal Government and is not subject to Federal information quality, privacy, security, and related guidelines.
  2. Agencies should choose the best approach to identify external links to users in a way that minimizes the impact on the usability of their websites and digital services.
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Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

All federal public websites must comply with existing laws and directives that relate to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

There are two requirements that all federal public websites must have:

  1. A page that includes certain content as required by the FOIA that includes information about how the public can request information under Links To Other Web Sites Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). This page us usually located on the agency’s principal website.
  2. A link to this page needs to be on the agency’s principal website and on any known sub-agency or other major entry points.

Organizations should review the FOIA and implementation guidance to ensure that their public websites meet the full range of requirements.

Suggested link text:

or

Required on:
  • Your principal website
  • Any known sub-agency site
  • Any known major entry points to your sites
Required by:

16, Links To Other Web Sites. Ensure Access to Mandatory Content

Laws, regulations, or other policies will occasionally mandate that agencies place certain links on their website. Agencies must respect and adhere to these statutory or executive-level mandates and incorporate these requirements in a manner that does not reduce the usability or performance of the agency’s website and digital services.

At a minimum, agencies must post links to the following information on the agency’s principal website and on any known sub-agency or other major entry points to their site:

  • A. USA.gov;
  • B. the website’s privacy policy;
  • C. the agency’s Freedom of Information Act webpage;
  • D. a page about the agency with descriptions of the agency organization structure, Links To Other Web Sites, mission, Kaspersky Internet Security 17.0.0.611 crack serial keygen statutory authority, and links to the following information:
    1. the agency’s strategic plan and annual performance plans;
    2. the agency’s Privacy Program Links To Other Web Sites agency point of contact as required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002
    3. the agency’s Open Government Page;
    4. the agency’s Plain Writing Page;
    5. information as required under the No Fear Act of 2002;
    6. information associated with the agency’s implementation of the Information Quality Act.

For other required links, Federal agencies should determine the best location on their website to place those links based on user needs and the underlying requirement from law or policy.

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Government Customer Support

USA.gov is the official web portal for the U.S. government.

When you link to USA.gov, please do it in an appropriate context as a service to your customers when they need to find official U.S, Links To Other Web Sites. government information and services.

We also Links To Other Web Sites you to link to USAGov en Español, the official Spanish language web portal of the U.S. government.

Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • Your principal website
  • Any known sub-agency site
  • Any known major entry points to your sites
Required by:

16. Ensure Access to Links To Other Web Sites Content

Laws, regulations, or other policies will occasionally mandate that agencies place certain links on their website. Agencies must respect and adhere to these statutory or executive-level mandates and incorporate these requirements in a manner that does not reduce the usability or performance of the agency’s website and digital services.

At a minimum, agencies must post links to the following information on the agency’s principal website and on any known sub-agency or other major entry points to their site:

  • A. USA.gov;
  • B. the website’s privacy policy;
  • C. the agency’s Freedom of Information Act webpage;
  • D. a page about the agency with descriptions of the agency organization structure, mission, and statutory authority, and links to the following information:
    1. the agency’s strategic plan and annual performance plans;
    2. the agency’s Privacy Program Page;
    3. the agency point of contact as required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002
    4. the agency’s Open Government Page;
    5. the agency’s Plain Writing Page;
    6. information as required under the No Fear Act of 2002;
    7. information associated with the agency’s implementation of the Information Quality Act.

For other required links, Federal agencies should determine the best location on their website to place those links based on user needs and the underlying requirement from law or policy.

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Privacy Policy

All federal public websites must comply with existing laws and directives that address the need to protect the privacy of the American people when they interact with their government. Some of the key requirements for federal public websites include:

  • Conducting privacy impact assessments;
  • Posting privacy policies on each website, including instructions on how to “opt-out” of any web tracking and measurement technologies the agency may use;
  • Posting a “Privacy Act Statement” that tells visitors the organization’s legal authority for collecting personal data and how the data will be used; and
  • Translating privacy policies into a standardized machine-readable format.
Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • Your principal website
  • Any known sub-agency site
  • Any known major entry points to your sites
  • Any web page that collects substantial information in identifiable form
Required by:

16. Ensure Access to Mandatory Content

Laws, regulations, Links To Other Web Sites, or other policies will occasionally mandate that agencies place certain links on their website. Agencies must respect and adhere to these statutory or executive-level mandates and incorporate these requirements in a manner that does not reduce the usability or performance of the agency’s website and digital services.

At a minimum, agencies must post links to the following information on the agency’s principal website and on any known sub-agency or other major entry points to their site:

  • A. USA.gov;
  • B. the website’s privacy policy;
  • C. the agency’s Freedom of Information Act webpage;
  • D. a page about the agency with descriptions of the agency organization structure, mission, and statutory authority, and links to the following information:
    1. the agency’s strategic plan and annual performance plans;
    2. the agency’s Privacy Program Page;
    3. the agency point of contact as required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002
    4. the agency’s Open Government Page;
    5. the agency’s Plain Writing Page;
    6. information as required under the No Fear Act of 2002;
    7. information associated with the agency’s implementation of the Information Quality Act.

For other required links, Federal agencies should determine the best location Links To Other Web Sites their website to place those links based on user needs and the underlying requirement from law or policy.

View the full legislation

III. Privacy Policies on Agency Websites

  1. Privacy Policy Clarification. To promote clarity to the public, agencies are required to refer to their general web site notices Links To Other Web Sites agency information handling practices as the “Privacy Policy.”

  2. Effective Date. Agencies are expected to implement the following changes to their websites by December 15, 2003.

  3. Exclusions: For purposes of web privacy policies, this guidance does not apply to:

    1. information other than “government information” as defined in OMB Circular A-130;
    2. agency intranet web sites that are accessible only by authorized government users (employees, contractors, consultants, fellows, grantees);
    3. national security systems defined at 40 U.S.C. 11103 as exempt from the definition of information technology (see section 202(i) of the E-government Act).
  4. Content of Privacy Policies.

    1. Agency Privacy Policies must comply with guidance issued in OMB Memorandum 99-18 and must now also include the following two new content areas:

      1. Consent to collection and sharing15. Agencies must now ensure that privacy policies:

        1. inform visitors whenever providing requested information is voluntary;
        2. inform visitors how to grant consent for use of voluntarily-provided information; and
        3. inform visitors how to grant consent to use mandatorily-provided information for other than statutorily-mandated uses or authorized routine uses under the Privacy Act.
      2. Rights under the Privacy Act or other privacy laws16. Agencies must now also notify web-site visitors of their rights under the Privacy Act or other privacy-protecting laws that may primarily apply to specific agencies (such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, the IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998, or the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act):

        1. in the body of the web privacy policy;
        2. via link to the applicable agency regulation (e.g., Privacy Act regulation and pertinent system notice); or
        3. via link to other official summary of statutory rights (such as the summary of Privacy Act rights in the FOIA/Privacy Act Reference Materials posted by the Federal Consumer Information Center at www.Firstgov.gov).
    2. Agency Privacy Policies must continue to address the following, modified, requirements:

      1. Nature, purpose, use and sharing of information collectedLinks To Other Web Sites. Agencies should follow existing policies (issued in OMB Memorandum 99-18) concerning notice of the nature, purpose, use and sharing of information collected via the Internet, as modified below:

        1. Privacy Act information. When agencies collect information subject to the Privacy Act, agencies are directed to explain what portion of the information is maintained and retrieved by name or personal identifier in a Privacy Act system of records and provide a Privacy Act Statement either:

          1. at the point of collection, or
          2. via link to the agency’s general Privacy Policy 18.
        2. “Privacy Act Statements”. Privacy Act Statements must notify users of the authority for and purpose and use of the collection of information subject to the Privacy Act, whether providing the information is mandatory or voluntary, and the effects of not providing all or any part of the requested Links To Other Web Sites Collected Information (site management data). Agency Privacy Policies must specify what information the agency collects automatically (i.e., user’s IP address, location, and time of visit) and identify the use for which it is collected (i.e., site management or security purposes).

        3. Interaction with children: Agencies that provide content to children under 13 and that collect personally identifiable information from these visitors should incorporate the requirements of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) into their Privacy Policies (see Attachment C) 19.

        4. Tracking and customization activities. Agencies are directed to adhere to the following modifications to OMB Memorandum 00-13 and the OMB follow-up guidance letter dated September 5, 2000:

          1. Tracking technology prohibitions:

            1. agencies are prohibited from using persistent cookies or any other means (e.g., web beacons) to track visitors’ activity on the Internet except as provided in subsection (b) below;
            2. agency heads may approve, or may authorize the heads of sub-agencies or senior official(s) reporting directly to the agency head to approve, the use of persistent tracking technology for a compelling need. When used, agency’s must post clear notice in the agency’s privacy policy of:

              • the nature of the information collected;
              • the purpose and use for the information;
              • whether and to whom the information will be disclosed; and
              • the privacy safeguards applied to the information collected.
            3. agencies must report the use of persistent tracking technologies as authorized for use by subsection b. above (see section VII) 20.

          2. The following technologies are not prohibited:

            1. Technology that is used to facilitate a visitor’s activity within a single session (e.g., a “session cookie”) and does not persist over time is not Links To Other Web Sites to the prohibition on the use of tracking technology.
            2. Customization technology (to customize a website at the visitor’s request) if approved by the agency head or designee for use (see v.1.b above) and where the following is posted in the Agency’s Privacy Policy:

              • the purpose of the tracking (i.e., customization of the site);
              • that accepting the customizing feature is voluntary;
              • that declining the feature still permits the Links To Other Web Sites to use the site; and
              • the privacy safeguards in place for handling the information collected.
            3. Agency use of password access to information that does not involve “persistent cookies” or similar technology.

        5. Law enforcement and homeland security sharing: Consistent with current practice, Internet privacy policies may reflect Links To Other Web Sites collected information may be shared and protected as necessary for authorized law enforcement, homeland security and national security activities.

      2. Security of the information21. Agencies should continue to comply with existing requirements for computer security in administering their websites 22 and post the following information in their Privacy Policy:

        1. in clear language, information about management, operational and technical controls ensuring the security and confidentiality of personally identifiable records (e.g., access controls, Links To Other Web Sites, data storage procedures, periodic testing of safeguards, Links To Other Web Sites, etc.), and
        2. in general terms, information about any additional safeguards used to identify and prevent unauthorized attempts to access or cause harm to information and systems. (The statement should be at a level to inform the public that their information is being protected while not compromising security.)
  5. Placement of notices. Agencies should continue to follow the policy identified in OMB Memorandum 99-18 regarding the posting of privacy policies on their websites. Specifically, agencies must post (or link to) privacy policies at:

    1. their principal web site;
    2. any known, major entry points to their sites;
    3. any web page that collects substantial information in identifiable form.
  6. Clarity of notices. Consistent with OMB Memorandum 99-18, privacy policies must be:

    1. clearly labeled and easily accessed;
    2. written in plain language; and
    3. made clear and easy to understand, whether by integrating all information and statements into a single posting, by layering a short “highlights” notice linked to full explanation, or by other means the agency determines is effective.
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Report Fraud to the Inspector General

A method for reporting evidence of waste, fraud, or abuse to the Inspector General, and linking to Inspector General audits and investigative reports.

Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • Homepage of each executive department, agency, and commission
Required by:

Sec. 534. (NOTE: 5 USC app. 6 note.) The departments, agencies, and commissions funded under this Act, shall establish and maintain on the homepages of their Internet websites–

  • (1) a direct link to the Internet websites of their Offices of Inspectors General; and
  • (2) a mechanism on the Offices of Inspectors General website by which individuals may anonymously report cases of waste, fraud, or abuse with respect to those Departments, agencies, and commissions.
View the full legislation

Security

Agencies must have a way for the public to report potential security vulnerabilities, and explain how the agency will respond to such reports.

  • Ensure your site’s Security Contact and Organization are current in the .gov registrar
  • Publish a vulnerability disclosure policy at [agency].gov/vulnerability-disclosure-policy
Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • Your website policies page
Required by:
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Binding Operational Directive 20-01
  • OMB M-20-32, Improving Vulnerability Identification, Links To Other Web Sites, Management, and Remediation

These requirements apply to executive branch departments and agencies and their public websites. Check the specific law or policy to see if it also applies to the judicial or legislative agencies, or intranets.

The Federal Web Managers Council recommends that government agencies use consistent link labels for common content found on government websites. These recommendations are based on industry standard link labels and a usability study of common government terms usability study of common government terms (MS PowerPoint, 144 KB, Links To Other Web Sites, 49 slides, July 2004).

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Do Outbound Links Affect SEO?

But do these outbound links affect how your website ranks in search engine results?

On this page, we’ll take a look at outbound links, what they are, how you can use them, Links To Other Web Sites, and how they impact your search engine optimization (SEO) efforts. If you'd like to speak with a specialist about SEO or outbound links, you can contact us at 888-601-5359.

Independent research from Clutch has named

WebFX the top SEO company in the United States.

Over 200 WebFX clients have been interviewed by Clutch to discuss their experience partnering with us.

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What are outbound links?

Outbound links, also called external links, direct visitors from pages on your website to other sites on the Internet. Unlike inbound links, which send visitors to other pages on your website, outbound links send visitors to entirely different sites.

If another website links to you, it MacOS Archives s considered an outbound link. At the same time, if you link to another website, it is also an outbound link. 

Typically, external links pass more value than internal links. This is because search engines believe that what other people say about you is more important than what you say about yourself, Links To Other Web Sites. In other words, if more websites link to your site, you will appear to be a more credible source.

External links are also harder to manipulate, so they are one of the best ways for search engines to determine the popularity and relevance of a particular website or page.

There are two kinds of outbound links: nofollow and dofollow. Dofollow links pass on ranking power from your website to the target page, while nofollow links do not. In other words, nofollow links tell search engines not to follow links.

All links are automatically dofollow by default. To create a nofollow link, you need to add the rel=“nofollow” tag inside your code.

By default, links look like this:

<a href="http://www.webfx.com">Email marketing</a>

Nofollow links include the rel=“nofollow” attribute, and they look like this:

<a href="http://www.webfx.com rel=“nofollow”>Email marketing</a>

Later, we’ll take a look at when you should use nofollow tags when creating outbound links.

Why are outbound links important?

Here are several reasons why you should include outbound links on your website.

Heightens popularity

Search engines, like Google, aim to show searchers the most relevant results for their search queries. And external links are a great metric for determining the popularity of a given web page. The more links a page receives from other sources, the more popular it appears.

This sends positive signals to search engines and can boost a page’s rank in search results, Links To Other Web Sites, meaning that more searchers will click and view the content.

Increases relevance

Links also provide important clues about the relevance of a page, and this is extremely helpful for search engines. Ultimately, search engines want users to find the information they are looking for, and when you include links to helpful content, you are doing them a great service.

In addition, Links To Other Web Sites, the anchor text used in the links is usually a good indicator of the content on the target page or website. For example, if you are linking to a page about cat food, you wouldn’t make Links To Other Web Sites anchor text say “dog toys for sale.”

The target and source page, as well as the domain contained in a link also provide helpful hints to search engines about the relevancy of a particular page. Since links point to related content, search engines can better establish knowledge hubs Links To Other Web Sites the Internet that they can use to verify the importance of a page or website.

In other words, linking out to relevant content helps search engines understand your niche, and it can increase trust in your website.

Improves reputation

Outbound links can also impact the reputation of your site.

If you link out to spammy sites, it will reflect negatively on your own website. The minute someone clicks on a link to a spam site, they will remember that you sent them there, and they will likely associate your website with the spam content. This is why link farms and reciprocal link schemes are such a bad idea and lead to penalties.

Sites with zero outbound links are dead ends, and they people typically don’t like dead ends. This can make your website appear to be unhelpful and inferior, which can negatively impact Links To Other Web Sites rankings in search results.

Not including any outbound links on your website is like reading a research report with no bibliography, Links To Other Web Sites. People will wonder where you are getting the information and if it’s coming from a high authority source.

On the other hand, including outbound links to relevant, high authority sources can boost your reputation and help you appear as a more authoritative source.

Boosts value

No matter how great your website is, it will never contain all the relevant information someone might be looking for about a specific topic.

By linking out to other helpful content, you can increase the value your website provides to visitors and make their experience more rewarding.

Ultimately, if people know that you publish and link to quality content, they will want to keep coming back for more. And they will consider your site to be a more valuable source of information on the web.

Encourages backlinks

In addition, when you link out to other credible sources on the web, they will be more likely to link to your site. And it signals to other people that you want to participate in the web’s natural linking environment.

Including links to relevant content is a great way to build incentives for bloggers, journalists, and website owners to engage with your site and link to your content. This not only improves the perceived authority of your site, it can also boost your rankings in search results and help more people discover and interact with your business.

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Do outbound links affect SEO?

Earning links to your website from other authority sources is an important ranking factor, and it can help you show up higher in search results for keywords and phrases related to your business.

In fact, SEO experts agree that external links are the most important source of ranking power because search engines view them as third-party votes for your website.

But do outbound links on your own website impact SEO?

A recent study conducted by marketing firm Reboot showed a positive correlation between a page’s outbound links and its rankings in search results. Reboot hypothesized that Google can determine the authority of a page or website based on the sources it links to.

For the experiment, the firm created 10 new websites, each targeting the same keyword. However, only half of the websites included links to high authority sources. All the sites contained similar content and tag structure, though it was Links To Other Web Sites enough to avoid duplicate content Links To Other Web Sites then monitored and recorded keyword search results over a five-month period. Each of the pages that contained outbound links ranked higher than pages with no outbound links, and Reboot concluded that relevant, outgoing links to authority websites positively impact search rankings.

Though Reboot took as many uncontrolled variables as possible, Links To Other Web Sites, there are still some unanswered questions. For example, does linking to higher authority sources boost rankings more than linking to a lower authority source? What about follow vs. nofollow links?

While there are still some unanswered questions, this study seems to show that including outbound links to high authority sites can help your SEO efforts. At the very least, it won’t hurt your SEO, so if you’re hesitant to link out to other sites, just consider these results.

Outbound linking best practices

Next, we’ll take a look at some outbound linking tips that can help your website get the most out of your SEO strategy. 

Use descriptive anchor text

Anchor text is the underlined, highlighted text that you can click to follow a link to another page.

When creating an outbound link, you should use descriptive keywords in the anchor text. You don’t want to use the same keyword every time or you will run the risk of triggering spam detectors.

However, you want to use clear text that describes the topic or keywords contained on the target page. This will improve usability for both users and search engines. 

Look for natural linking opportunities

Creating a resources page with lots of outbound links is generally not a good idea Links To Other Web Sites the links are not natural for readers.

Instead, Links To Other Web Sites, look for opportunities to include relevant, outbound links directly in your content. For example, if you’re writing about a particular marketing tool, why not include a link to it? This is helpful for users and can help support your pages.

You can include outbound links naturally on your pages to explain technical references and provide additional points of view. In addition, you can link to authority resources that contain more helpful information on a particular topic or help to further clarify a point.

You can also include links to statistics and studies that support your articles.

In April 2016, Google started issuing penalties to websites that contained unnatural or irrelevant outbound links. Believing that the unnatural links were an attempt to artificially boost other website’s rankings, Google applied a “manual spam action” to the offending websites.

Webmasters were directed to either remove the questionable links or add nofollow tags to each one.

Avoid too many outbound links

While outbound links are definitely valuable, too many outbound links can annoy website visitors.

If you’re going to include external links on your pages, you need to make sure that they are helpful and relevant for your readers.

Including links in your copy basically says to readers, “Hey! Stop what you’re reading, and click here!”

So you need to be careful about including too many outbound links to avoid distracting readers and sending people away from your website. 

When should make outbound links nofollow?

Now, let’s take a look at some times when it’s appropriate to use nofollow links.

Generally, Links To Other Web Sites should use nofollow links any time you don’t want to pass on ranking power, also called link juice, to the page or website a link targets. Using nofollow links, you can instruct search engines not to count links to pages as “votes” in favor of the other page or website. In other words, the nofollow tag prevents credit from being passed to other websites linked to from your site.

Here are a few examples of when it’s appropriate to use nofollow links.

Comments

If you allow people to comment on your site, you can expect them to link drop. This means that they will include links to their website in order to receive link juice.

However, you might not want to endorse their site. Using the nofollow attribute, you can prevent search engines from following the links and passing value to the commenter’s site.

User-generated content

Similarly, if you allow people to contribute content to your site, Links To Other Web Sites, they can include links to their websites in order to receive link juice from your site. You can use nofollow links to prevent your site from passing credit to other sites you don’t necessarily want to endorse. 

Paid links

You might have links on your website to partner websites or sponsored content.

If you want to avoid passing credit via links people buy on your site, Links To Other Web Sites, simply use a nofollow link. This will help you avoid appearing suspicious to Google, and it can prevent you from encountering unwanted penalties.

Embeds

If you add widgets or infographics to your website from other sources and don’t necessarily want to advocate for the content, you can make the links nofollow.

Basically, you can use nofollow links any time you link to other sites and want to avoid endorsing them.

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Adding hyperlinks to a web page

Creating a hyperlink to another of your pages

  • Select the text you want to be a hyperlink. The text you select should exactly match the name of the page it will link to. This may mean rewriting the text a little. For example instead of typing 'Click here for more information', you should use 'See Links To Other Web Sites of page> for more information', and select <name of page> as the hyperlink
  • Click the Hyperlink icon
  • When the Create Hyperlink window appears, select the file you want to link to.

Create Hyperlink dialogue box

  • FrontPage lists first all the pages that you have open for editing. This can Links To Other Web Sites a useful feature if you have open a page within a subfolder that you want to link to as it saves you having to open the subfolder in which it is stored, Links To Other Web Sites. If you want to link to a page within a subfolder of your Web that isn't already open, just double-click on the subfolder from the list and then select the relevant page
  • Click OK

Creating a Links To Other Web Sites to a page on the internet

  • Open the browser you normally use to access the internet
  • Go to the web address you want to link to - eg www.lse.ac.uk
  • Right-click in the address/ location field and select Copy
  • Switch from the browser back to FrontPage
  • Select the text you want to be the hyperlink
  • Click the Hyperlink icon Create Hyperlink icon
  • When the Create Hyperlink window appears, delete all the text in the URL field ('URL' is another name for the address/ location). You can remove the 'http://' because when you copied the address from the browser, you included that part as well
  • Right-click and select Paste
  • Click OK - the text will now have become a hyperlink

Creating a hyperlink to a bookmark

  • Select the text you want to use as a bookmark
  • Select Insert > Bookmark from the main toolbar

Bookmark dialogue box

  • You'll see that the letter you selected has also become the name of the bookmark. On any page, bookmark names have to be unique but there is also another constraint you should be aware of
  • Our best practice advice is not to have spaces in file or folder names and this advice also applies to bookmark names. The reason is that some browsers don't understand bookmark names that contain spaces and clicking the link won't scroll the page
  • To avoid this problem, either remove all the spaces or separate the words using just hyphens - or underscores _
  • Click OK to create the bookmark. You'll see in FrontPage that the bookmarked text has a broken line beneath it; this doesn't show in the browser
  • At the top of the page, select the text that you want to become a link to a bookmark
  • Click the Hyperlink icon on the main toolbar Create Hyperlink icon
  • The Create Hyperlink window will appear
  • From the bookmark drop-down menu select the bookmark you have just created

Create Hyperlink dialogue box

Checking and fixing links

  • Switch to the Reports view. Links To Other Web Sites the Reports toolbar till it docks beneath the formatting drop-down menus if necessary
  • You should see the Site Summary report displayed - if not, select View > Reports > Site Summary
  • Click the Broken Hyperlinks report
    • Note: if you rename a file from within FrontPage as our best practice guidance suggests, FrontPage will automatically fix any links that might be broken as a result
  • Unverified hyperlinks are links to pages outside of your FrontPage Web, either on the LSE Web server or other Internet addresses
  • To validate the unknown links click the Verify Hyperlinks icon (a link with a red tick underneath)
  • When the Verify Hyperlinks window appears, click the Start button
  • FrontPage will now visit each link and report back if there is a page at the address specified. If you look along the status bar at the bottom of the window you should the numbers of broken internal and broken external hyperlinks
  • Right-click the broken hyperlink and select Edit Page. The page will open in the Page view with the broken link already selected
  • Click the Hyperlink icon as before when creating Medical report keygen,serial,crack,generator,unlock hyperlink
  • When the Edit Hyperlink icon appears, select the correct page if the link points to one of your web pages or paste the correct address from the browser if the link goes to an address beyond your pages
  • Click OK and save the page

^ Back to top

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Backlinks

What Are Backlinks?

Backlinks (also known as “inbound links”, “incoming links” or “one way links”) are links from one website to a page on another website. Google and other major search engines consider backlinks “votes” for a specific page. Pages with a high number of backlinks tend to have high organic search engine rankings.

For example, here is a link from Forbes to my website.

Because that link points directly to a page on my website, it’s a “backlink”.

Why Are Backlinks Important?

Backlinks are basically votes from other websites, Links To Other Web Sites. Each of these votes tells search engines: “This content is valuable, credible and useful”.

So the more of these “votes” you have, the higher your site will rank in Google and other search engines.

Using links in a search engine algorithm is nothing new. In fact, backlinks formed the foundation of Google’s original algorithm (known as “PageRank”).

Even though Google has made thousands of changes to its algorithm since then, backlinks remain a key ranking signal.

For example, an industry study that we conducted found that links remain Google’s key ranking signal.

And Google has confirmed that backlinks remain one of their three most important search engine ranking factors.

What Types of Backlinks are Valuable?

Not all backlinks are created equal.

In other words, Links To Other Web Sites, if you want to rank higher in the SERPs, focus on quality backlinks.

Put another way:

A single quality backlink can be more powerful than 1,000 low-quality backlinks.

As it turns out, high-quality backlinks tend to share the same key traits.

Trait #1: They Come From Trusted, Authoritative Websites

Would you rather get a backlink from Harvard… or a random guy’s website?

As it turns out, Google feels the same way.

This concept is known as “Domain Authority”. Essentially, the more authority a site has, the more authority it can pass on to your site (via a link).

For example, here’s a link that I got from TechCrunch.

According to Ahrefs, TechCrunch is an extremely authoritative domain.

Because that link comes from an authority site, Google puts lots of weight on it. In fact, I noticed a boost in my organic search engine traffic right after TechCrunch linked to me.

Are these links hard to get? Definitely.

Are they worth it? Absolutely.

Trait #2: They Include Your Target Keyword In The Link’s Anchor Text

As a reminder, anchor text is the visible text part of a link.

In general, Links To Other Web Sites, you want your links to have anchor text that includes your target keyword.

In fact, a recent industry study found a correlation between keyword-rich anchor text and higher rankings for that keyword.

Now, a quick word of warning:

You don’t want to go overboard with keyword-rich anchor text. In fact, Google has a filter in their algorithm called “Google Penguin”.

Google Penguin filters out websites that use black hat link building strategies. And it specifically focuses on sites that build backlinks with exact match anchor text.

Trait #3: The Site (and Page) Linking to You Is Topically Related To Your Site

When a website links to another website, Google wants to see that the two sites are related.

This makes sense if you think about it:

Imagine you just published an article about running a marathon.

In that case, Google will put MUCH more weight on links from sites about marathons, Links To Other Web Sites, running, fitness vs. sites about fishing, Links To Other Web Sites, unicycles, and digital marketing.

Trait #4: The Link Is a “Dofollow” Link

Google and other search engines ignore links with the "nofollow" tag attached to it.

(In other words, nofollow links don’t count search engine ranking algorithms).

Fortunately, the vast majority of links on the web are “dofollow” links.

And most of the links that have the nofollow tag aren’t that valuable to begin with. For example, links from these sources tend to be nofollow:

These links aren’t super helpful for SEO anyway, so Links To Other Web Sites not a big deal that they’re nofollow.

Trait #5: The Link Is From a Domain That Hasn’t Linked to You Before

Let’s say you get a link from Website A.

Great.

Well, let’s say Website A links to you again. And again. And again.

Are the 2nd, 3rd and 4th links as powerful as the first one?

No.

As it turns out, links from the same website have diminishing returns.

Or put another way:

It’s usually better to get 100 links from 100 different websites than 1,000 links from the same website.

In fact, our search engine ranking correlation study found that the number of sites linking to you (not the total number of backlinks) correlated with Google rankings more than any other factor.

Now that you’ve seen what types of backlinks are the most helpful for your Google rankings, it’s time for me to show you how to start building them.

Best Practices

Create a Linkable Assets

If you want people to link to your website, you need something on your site worth linking to.

(Also known as “Linkable Assets”).

A Linkable Asset can be a blog post, a video, Links To Other Web Sites, a piece of software, a quiz, a survey… basically anything that people will want to link to.

In most cases, your linkable asset will be an amazing piece of content (which is why search engine optimization and content marketing are so closely tied together).

For example, when I first started my blog, I published this list of 200+ Google ranking factors.

One day I read that Google uses 200 ranking signals. Which made me curious: “What are these 200 signals?”.

Of course, Links To Other Web Sites, Google wasn’t about to announce them to the world, Links To Other Web Sites. So I started compiling statements from Google and patents that I found online.

Compiling these 200 factors was extremely time-consuming (it took me over 2 Links To Other Web Sites. But in the end, I FINALLY compiled a list of 200 ranking factors that Google might use in their algorithm.

To date, this single piece of content has generated over 25,800 backlinks from 5,870 domains.

How about another example?

One of my most successful posts icloud hack bypass date (in terms of backlinks and organic traffic) is my ultimate guide to YouTube SEO.

When I started writing this post I was starting to have some success with YouTube marketing. So I decided to compile and share what I learned in the form of an ultimate guide.

I also decided to include a lot of examples in my guide:

(Something that most of the other content on this topic lacked)

Even though this post hasn’t generated nearly the same amount of links as my Google Ranking Factors post, it’s still racked up quite a few backlinks.

Build Backlinks from Link Roundups

Imagine if people published blog posts with the sole purpose of linking out to quality content.

(The type of quality content that you publish on your site already)

It’d be pretty great, right?

Fortunately, that’s a real thing. And they’re called link roundups.

Here’s an example:

Link roundups are daily, weekly or monthly blog posts that link to outstanding content.

Here’s an example of a backlink that I recently built from a roundup:

Here’s the step-by-step process.

  1. Find Link Roundups In Your Niche: Use search strings in Google search, like ““Keyword” + “link roundup”.
  2. Pitch Your Resource: (Gently) suggest that they include your linkable asset to the roundup.

And if your post is a good fit for that person’s roundup, you’ll get a high-quality link.

(They may also share your content on social media)

Use The Moving Man Method

Here is the 3-step process:

  1. First, you find web pages, resources or businesses that are outdated, rebranded or recently changed names.
  2. Then, find the sites that are still linking to these outdated resources.
  3. Finally, Links To Other Web Sites, you email people to let them know that they’re linking to something that’s out of date.

Let me show you how this works with a real-life example…

A while back I read that a website for a big SEO agency website suddenly shut down.

This meant that they had lots of pages on their site that weren’t working anymore…

…pages that lots of people were still linking to.

Specifically, I noticed that an infographic about SEO on their site wasn’t working anymore. Which was perfectbecause I had just published my own SEO-focused infographic.

So that was the first step.

Next, I had to see who actually linked to that infographic.

So I fired up Ahrefs and pulled all of their links:

Finally, Links To Other Web Sites, I emailed everyone that linked to the infographic to let them know the image wasn’t working anymore. I also let them know that my infographic would make a great replacement for the BlueGlass one.

Here’s the script I used:

Hi [Name],

I was searching for some content to read about [Topic] this morning. And I came across your excellent post: [Post Title].

Anyway, I couldn’t help but notice that you mentioned [Outdated Resource] in your article.

As you may have heard, [Problem With Outdated Resource].

Here’s a screenshot of where that link is located: [Screenshot]

Also, I recently published a piece of content about [Topic]. It might make a good replacement for the [Outdated Resource].

Either way, I hope this helps you and have a great day!

Thanks,
[Your Name]

As you can see, people were more than happy to link to me:

Broken Link Building

This strategy is similar to the Moving Man Method you just learned about.

The difference is that with broken link building, you’re only looking for pages that have 404 errors.

To find these 404 links, you want to focus on resource pages in your niche. So if you’re in the fitness niche you’d search in Google using these search strings:

  • "fitness" + "resource page"
  • "fitness" + "resources"
  • "fitness" + "recommended sites"
  • "fitness" + "links"

And you’d find pages like this.

Now you could email the site owner and ask for a link. But I’ve found that begging doesn’t work very well.

Instead, let the site owner know about any broken links that you find.

You can easily find broken links on any page. Just use the nifty Check My Links Chrome Extension.

This program quickly finds any broken links the page happens to have. It also highlights them in red to make them easy to find:

The last thing you need to do is email the site owner about their dead link.

Hi [Site Owner Name],

I was just browsing around your resources page today, and among the lists of great resources, were some broken links.

Here’s a few of them:

[URL 1]
[URL 2]
[URL 3]

Oh, and I have a website, [Your Website], that also regularly posts quality content related to whatever. If you think so too, feel free to post a link to it on your resources page.

Either way I hope this helps and keep up the good work!

Thanks,
[Your Name]

Guest Posting

Is guest posting dead?

Not really.

In fact, when you’re first starting out, guest blogging is one of the BEST ways to get links to your site.

In fact, when I first Links To Other Web Sites Backlinko, I wrote over 50 guest posts and interviews in 12 months!

And the links I got from guest posting definitely gave my organic traffic a boost.

That said, I was very strategic about things. I made sure to only write guest posts for quality sites in my niche.

So if you run a site about the Paleo Diet, and write a guest post on a site about iPhones, that’s going to look spammy to Google.

But when you write mind-blowing guest posts for quality websites in your industry, those links DO help.

The thing is, finding places to guest post can be a HUGE pain.

But there’s an easier way…

Here’s how it works:

First, find someone in your industry that writes a lot of guest posts.

Next, go to one of their published guest posts. And grab the headshot they use in their author bio:

Finally, pop the URL of that screenshot into Google reverse image search.

And you’ll get a list of places that published guest posts on.

Infographics and Other Visual Assets

Do infographics work as well as they used to? Probably not.

But they’re still an effective link building strategy.

In fact, when we looked at what types of content generate the most links, infographics came out near the top.

For example, one of the first infographics I ever made took only took a few hours to put together (I also hired a professional designer to make it look professional).

Even though this infographic didn’t Links To Other Web Sites viral, it led to some solid backlinks:

To be clear: I didn’t just publish my infographic and hope for the best.

Like any piece of content that you publish, you need to strategically promote your infographic. And to do that, I aurora hdr key Archives using a strategy called “Guestographics”.

I outline exactly how Guestographics work in this post.

Submit Testimonials

Companies big and small love to show off customer testimonials.

And you’re using a product or service that you love (or at least like), consider sending them a testimonial.

To show that you’re a real person they’ll often add a link to your website… without you even having to ask.

Here’s an example:

Blogger Reviews

If you have a piece of software, physical product, consulting service or ANYTHING of value that you sell, you can easily turn that into dozens of high-quality backlinks.

How?

By offering your product to bloggers for free.

Here’s how:

  1. Find bloggers in your niche that might be interested in what you have to offer. If you sell an information product that teaches people how to make their own soaps, Links To Other Web Sites, you’d Google things like “soap making”, “make soap at home” etc.
  2. Your results will be a mixed bag of blogs, news websites and “how to” websites like eHow. Filter out how-to sites or news sites. You’ll be left with a solid list bloggers that might be interested in your offer, like this one:
  3. Reach out to them with this email script:

    Hey [Site Owner Name],

    I was searching for [Some Homemade Soap Recipes] today when I came across [Website].

    Awesome stuff!

    Actually, I just launched a guide that [Teaches People How To Make Luxury Soaps At Home]. I usually charge [$X], but I’d be more than happy to send it over to you on the house, Links To Other Web Sites.

    Let me know how that sounds.

    Cheers,
    [Your First Name]

One word of warning: You want to be VERY careful about the language you use for this strategy.

Note how you don’t offer your product in exchange for a link or review… which would violate Google’s Webmaster Guidelines.

Instead, send them the product and let them decide if it’s worth a mention on their blog.

Link Reclamation

Link reclamation is simple:

First, find mentions of your company that don’t link to your site.

Here’s an example:

See how the author of that article above mentioned my website… but didn’t link to it?

That’s where link reclamation comes into play.

Instead of saying “I wish they linked to me”, you proactively reach out and ask them to link.

In my experience, a friendly reminder is usually enough to get most people to log into WordPress and add your link.

Here’s the step-by-step process:

  1. Use a tool like BuzzSumo and Mention.com to find mentions of your brand online.

    When you do, Links To Other Web Sites, you’ll get a heads up whenever someone writes about you:

  2. Check to see whether or not the person that mentioned you also linked back to your site (either your homepage or internal page). If they linked to your site, you’re set.

    If not, move onto step #3…

  3. Send them this friendly email.
    Hey [Name],

    I just wanted to reach out and say “thanks” for mentioning [Your Brand] in your excellent article yesterday.

    We really, really appreciate it.

    I’m reaching out today to ask if you could add a link back to our site. That way, people can easily find us while reading your article.

    Either way, thanks for the shout out and keep up the great work!

    Thanks,
    [Your First Name]

Use HARO

HARO (short for Links To Other Web Sites a Reporter Out) is one of the best ways to get high authority backlinks from news sites.

Here’s how HARO works:

  1. Sign Up To HARO as a source here.
  2. You’ll get three emails per day from reporters looking for sources, like this one:
  3. Respond with your credentials and some helpful tips.

Easy right? You give a reporter a quote and they’ll hook you up with a backlink.

That’s all there is to it.

For example, recently got a sweet link from Entrepreneur.com by replying to a HARO request:

Reverse Engineer Your Competitor’s Backlinks

Every industry has its own set of link building opportunities.

So I recommend setting aside some time to reverse engineer your competition, Links To Other Web Sites. That way, you can find link opportunities that only exist in your niche.

How about an example?

Let’s say you run a health and fitness blog.

And one of your competitors is Nerd Fitness.

Well, when I check out that site’s link profile in a backlink checker, I notice that A LOT of their links come from podcasts:

Specifically, people from that company (especially the founder, Steve Kamb) appear on other people’s podcasts as guests.

Just like that you have a nice list of places that you can go to get links.

(Obviously, you need to reach out to the people that run those podcasts and pitch yourself as a guest. Which takes work. But at least you know where to start).

Stick to Content Formats That Generate Links

Like I mentioned earlier, infographics are one content format that’s ideal for building backlinks.

But it’s one of many.

We also found that, even though they didn’t generate lots of social media shares, “Why posts” and “What posts” tended to get linked-to fairly often.

Learn More

Link Building: How to Get Powerful Backlinks: Video tutorial that shows you how to build backlinks to your site using white hat SEO techniques.

How to Get High Quality Backlinks (7 New Strategies): This is an updated list of link building strategies that focus on building new backlinks from authority websites.

15 Awesome Link Building Tools: If you’re serious about link building, you’ll need tools to help you do the job. Here’s a list of the best of the bunch.

How to Do a Basic Backlink Analysis on Your Competitors: Learn how to evaluate your competitors backlinks.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Required Web Content and Links

A list of required links that all federal websites need to have

If you manage a public website in the federal government’s executive branch, you are required to have certain content—or provide links to content—from specific places on your website.

This page makes it clear:

  • what links are required and the purpose they serve
  • the text that you should use for each link
  • where the link should be located on your site
  • which law or policy requires those links

Use the guidance below to implement these required links in a clear, user-friendly way.

One easy way to address these requirements is to implement the following three components of the U.S. Web Design System on your website:

Questions? send an email to digitalgov@gsa.gov


About Page

You are required to have an “About” page on your site.

On your primary agency site, you would include information about the agency with descriptions of the agency organization structure, mission, and statutory authority, and links to the following information:

  • the agency’s strategic plan and annual performance plans
  • the agency’s privacy policy page (more on this below)
  • the agency’s Small Business point of contact, as required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002
  • the agency’s Open Government page
  • the agency’s Plain Writing page
  • information as required under the No Fear Act of 2002 (more on this below)
  • information associated with the agency’s implementation of the Information Quality Act

Secondary agency sites also need an “About” page that describes your site and links to your own website policies. It should also links to the primary agency’s “About” page. For example, our Digital.gov About page has:

  • text about our program
  • a link to our own website policies (which includes links GSA’s policy page)
  • a link to GSA’s About page
Suggested link text:

or

Required on:
  • Your principal website
  • Any known sub-agency site
  • Any known major entry points to your sites
Required by:

16. Ensure Access to Mandatory Content

Laws, regulations, or other policies will occasionally mandate that agencies place certain links on their website. Agencies must respect and adhere to these statutory or executive-level mandates and incorporate these requirements in a manner that does not reduce the usability or performance of the agency’s website and digital services.

At a minimum, agencies must post links to the following information on the agency’s principal website and on any known sub-agency or other major entry points to their site:

  • A. USA.gov;
  • B. the website’s privacy policy;
  • C. the agency’s Freedom of Information Act webpage;
  • D. a page about the agency with descriptions of the agency organization structure, mission, and statutory authority, and links to the following information:
    1. the agency’s strategic plan and annual performance plans;
    2. the agency’s Privacy Program Page;
    3. the agency point of contact as required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002
    4. the agency’s Open Government Page;
    5. the agency’s Plain Writing Page;
    6. information as required under the No Fear Act of 2002;
    7. information associated with the agency’s implementation of the Information Quality Act.

For other required links, Federal agencies should determine the best location on their website to place those links based on user needs and the underlying requirement from law or policy.

View the full legislation

Accessibility Statement

Federal agencies must:

  • develop an accessibility statement,
  • add it as an “Accessibility” page on the agency’s main website and provide a link to it,
  • link to it on all secondary public-facing websites, and
  • link to it on the agency’s Intranet website.

The accessibility statement should, at a minimum, include:

  • contact information for the agency Section 508 program,
  • date of the last update, and
  • the ability for website visitors to provide comments and/or feedback regarding the agency Section 508 program.

Sample and best-in-practice accessibility statements can be found at Section508.gov on the pages for IT Accessibility Laws and Policies, and Executive Guide to Federal IT Accessibility.

Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • All agency websites, Links To Other Web Sites, internal and external. Secondary sites can link to the accessibility statement on the domain website.
Required by:

12. Ensure Accessibility for Individuals with Disabilities

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act was enacted to eliminate barriers in information technology, open new opportunities for people with disabilities, and encourage the development of technologies that will help achieve these goals. 28 The law applies to all Federal departments and agencies when they develop, procure, maintain, or use electronic and information technology. 29 Under Section 508, departments and agencies must ensure that employees and members of the public with disabilities have access to information and data that is comparable to access available to others unless an undue burden would be imposed on the department or agency.

A. Agencies must comply with Section 508 and with the Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) Accessibility Standards. 30 Additionally, agencies must also adhere to their own Section 508 regulations and policies. Section 508 does not limit rights, remedies, or procedures otherwise available under other Federal laws, including Sections 501, 503, and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 31;
B. Section 508 technical and EIT Accessibility requirements must be included in the requirements document for the procurement of EIT products and services and planned for and built into the development, operations and management lifecycle of a Federal website or digital service. Any new functionality must be regularly tested to ensure it meets the EIT Accessibility Standards and is accessible for Links To Other Web Sites with disabilities.;
C.Agencies must develop accessibility statements for their website and appoint a Section 508 Coordinator as required by OMB Memorandum, Strategic Plan for Improving Management of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. 32;


View the full legislation

Increase Transparency

Transparency of Federal programs, performance, Links To Other Web Sites, and spending facilitates increases in accountability and citizen engagement. To support increased transparency, the Accessibility Committee has expanded on information available to agencies by creating a best practices library. The library may be found at https://cio.gov/2011/05/ and contains examples of best practices in policy and procedures that can increase transparency. Feedback from the listening sessions and the national dialogue indicates several areas that would benefit from more transparency. Specific areas include opportunities for public engagement, inter-agency collaboration, and standardizing agency approaches to Section 508 implementation.

Transparency of agency Section 508 practices and application will be improved through two key actions: (1) providing the Links To Other Web Sites with a standard feedback mechanism and statement available on agency websites, and (2) making www.section508.gov the one-stop information resource for agencies with respect to successful Section 508 management and implementation. Specifically, within 180 days of the release of this strategic plan:

  1. the General Services Administration (GSA) will share with OMB the action plan for transforming www.section508.gov into the one-stop source of information and communication for successfully managing Section 508 implementation throughout the acquisition lifecycle.
  2. Federal agencies will include an accessibility statement on all inter- and intranet websites. Secondary sites can link to the accessibility statement on the domain website. The accessibility statement should, at a minimum, include contact information for the agency Section 508 program, date of the last update, and the ability for website visitors to provide comments and/or feedback regarding the agency Section 508 program, Links To Other Web Sites. Sample and best-in-practice accessibility statements can be found at www.section508.gov.
View the full legislation

Budget and Performance Reports

Agencies are required to have a page on their website that has the following information:

  • Strategic plan
  • Annual performance plan (APP) and Annual performance report (APR)
  • Annual financial statements
  • GAO high-risk improvement plans Links To Other Web Sites status of implementation (if not included in APP and APR)
  • Inspector General audits and investigative reports, and a method to report evidences of Links To Other Web Sites, fraud, Links To Other Web Sites, or abuse to the Inspector General
Suggested link text:
Required on:
  • The homepage of your agency’s principal website
Required by:

Part 6, Section 210 Links To Other Web Sites

You can watch a thematic video

How to link one page to another page in HTML

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