How to Open Exe Files on Mac (with Pictures) - wikiHow

Mac Game Archives

Mac Game Archives

Epic Games has filed an appeal against the ruling in its case against Apple, further prolonging the already year-long legal battle between. A screenshot of the 1986 Macintosh computer game Dark Castle. Internet Archive. May 24, 2017. Share. I'm a reporter first, and a writer second. Unity download archive wish to continue to develop and ship their games/content and stay on a stable version for an extended period. Downloads (Mac).

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How to Open Rar File on Mac - How to Extract RAR Files on macOS

Mac Game Archives - sorry, that

Flashpoint is a massive archive of over 38,000 Flash games and nearly 2,500 Flash animations. It’s by far the most comprehensive preservation project of its kind. In fact, it is so comprehensive that you may have some trouble figuring out where you’re supposed to start with it.

Well, if you’re a Windows user who is feeling bold and has space to spare, you can download what’s called Flashpoint Ultimate. This download (which currently sits at 530+ GB) contains the entire Flashpoint collection and allows you to access every file in that collection (even when you’re offline.)

Alternatively, there is the “Flashpoint Infinity” option. This option essentially allows you to download games on a case-by-case basis. While you will need to be connected to the internet during the initial downloads, you’ll be able to access the downloaded files offline after that.

Mac and Linux users can also access versions of these downloads, but because Flash support for those platforms is still in the experimental phase, you may find that not every file works as intended.

While Flashpoint isn’t exactly a complete collection of every Flash game and project ever made, it is an undeniably impressive effort and the best way to find some of the Flash games that defined an era of the internet best remembered for the sometimes humble contributions of a group of creators motivated largely by passion.

Download Flashpoint Here

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

We’re still looking into what causes this error to pop up for some players on Mac. These solutions might help you resolve the issue:

  • Update to the latest version of Origin.
  • Reset Origin on your Mac.
  • If it happens after you’ve installed a new expansion pack, try uninstalling it.

System requirements for an expansion pack are often higher than the ones for The Sims 3 itself, so sometimes a Mac that will run the base game has trouble running some of the later expansion packs.

If you’re sure that your Mac meets requirements, and you installed your expansion from a disk, try installing a digital copy through Origin instead. You won’t need to buy the expansion again, just redeem your code in Origin if the expansion is not showing on your account.

If none of these fixes work, visit Answers HQ for troubleshooting steps and a video walkthrough.

Have you updated your game or run the super-patcher?

It’s best to make sure The Sims 3 is fully up to date before you install an expansion. Then, check for updates for that expansion before you try to install another one.

If you’re playing through Origin, it’ll keep everything up to date for you.

Installing the super-patcher after installing expansions may not cause any issues. If you still see some problems with unknown errors and you installed all expansions before using the super-patcher, try following these steps.

If you’ve done this a little out of order, you may not see any problems, but if you think it could be what’s causing the unknown error, try this:

  1. Uninstall The Sims 3.
  2. Reinstall The Sims 3 and update it(if you’re using Origin) or run the superpatcher (if you’re using disks).
  3. Then, install your expansions one by one.
  4. When you install and update everything, try launching The Sims 3 again.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

What It's Like to Use an Original Macintosh in 2017

I’m a reporter first, and a writer second, which means I often find myself writing in odd places. Not just geographically unusual, though there’s that, too. I write everywhere, with whatever technology is at hand.

Most of the time, I’m typing away in a plain text editor on my laptop. But I still write first drafts in reporter’s notebooks, and in the Notes section of my iPhone, and on scraps of paper when necessary.

Now here’s a first for me: I’m writing a story for The Atlantic in MacWrite 4.5, the word processing program first released with the Apple Macintosh in 1984 and discontinued a decade later. So here I am, awash in 1980s computing nostalgia, clacking away in an emulated version of the original software, thanks to the Internet Archive.

The only problem is, how am I going to file this story into The Atlantic’s 2017 web based content management system? (Also, the hyphen key isn’t working.) But more on that in a minute.

First, let me get out of here and switch back to my regular text editor. The Internet Archive’s latest in-browser emulator lets anyone with internet access play and use dozens of games and programs originally released for the first Apple Macintosh computers in all of their black-and-white, low-resolution glory. (Ah, so nice to have that hyphen back.)

Along with MacWrite, the collection includes MacPaint, Dark Castle, The Oregon Trail, Space Invaders, Frogger, Shuffle Puck, Brickles, Prince of Persia, and dozens more. The emulator doesn’t just launch the software itself, but situates users in the old-school Mac operating environment, meaning you often find yourself looking at a 1984-style desktop, and opening the program yourself.

“The presentation represents some shift in philosophies, in terms of what we wanted to do,” says Jason Scott, an archivist at the Internet Archive. Whereas Scott went with a “shock and awe” approach to earlier software emulators—making hundreds of programs available all at once—he decided to go for a more methodical, curated strategy this time. One big reason for this is quality control. He’s still fielding tech-support requests for the MS-DOS emulator the archive released in 2014. (It includes thousands of titles.) But Scott also knew the early Mac programs that people would want to see at the outset.

“The main one was Dark Castle,” Scott told me. “Everyone remembers Dark Castle because it was a particularly well-made, good-looking game—but not even a fun one, I want to point out! People playing it on the Mac emulation are not happy. There are reviews.”

Reviews like: “I can't tell if the emulator is laggy, making my controls unresponsive? Or is this just a terrible game? Maybe a bit of both,” as one person commented on the site.

“They are like, ‘This runs too slow for it to be good,’” Scott told me, “when what they really mean is the game was originally so unfair.”

“But it looks beautiful, and the sound is beautiful, so I knew Dark Castle would be a big deal,” he added.

For what it’s worth, I only vaguely remember Dark Castle from when I had an Apple IIc. When I tried playing it on the emulator this morning I was repeatedly killed by rabid bats, which I can confidently say is a reflection of my own rustiness and has nothing to do with the emulator quality. (It seemed to run pretty smoothly to me.)

But regardless of how well they run, the big question is why it’s worth the drudgery and the painstaking work of presenting ancient programs this way in the first place.

“The existential questions,” Scott said. “What is all this for? What do people need from the original Mac operating systems in the modern era?”

The Internet Archive focused on the Apple II era for a few reasons: It was a finite period of time, it represents a particularly rich moment in computing history, and people remain especially interested in the era. “Nostalgia, to be honest, is a huge chunk of it,” he added. “You’ve got people who come in, and look at the old thing, and they’re happy about the old thing, and then they move on.”

If all goes a planned, the next two emulators will be for the Commodore 64, which predated the early Macintosh; then Windows 98, which came after it. (“That’s only if it works,” Scott emphasized.)

Emulators can be quite buggy, given their complexity. A browser-based system involves the emulated machine running inside the browser's javascript environment, all within the computer running that browser. So, basically, “you’re running a computer within a simulated computer within another computer," Scott says. “It’s crazy.”

Scott’s also hoping to stretch the very idea of what people can do with emulators.

“The initial burst to emulation on the web was about removing the barrier to old software,” Scott told me. “The next realm will be that you can output the data that’s being generated and export it to your modern machine. That’s basically one developer away from happening right now. That’s the kind of thing people eventually will want and get.”

In the meantime, you can’t copy and paste text from the MacWrite emulator back to a contemporary word processor, for example—which is why I had to retype the opening to this story, letter by letter, just to get it into The Atlantic’s web-publishing program. This is still much easier than my predecessors had it, back when the Macintosh was brand new. It was around that time that my colleague James Fallows wrote a long piece for The Atlanticabout his own adventure into computerdom. In 1982, he was using a Processor Technology SOL-20 that had 48KB of random access memory. This was miraculous to him then, as were the floppy disks it took, and the printer he hooked up to the machine—it spit out about one page per minute.

It wasn’t all peachy, even for an early adopter like him. There was the time his computer broke in dramatic fashion, sending him back to his old Smith-Corona typewriter for a full month. And also, Fallows wrote: “Computers cause another, more insidious problem, by forever distorting your sense of time.”

What he meant was that computers change people’s expectations about what we should be able to do, and how quickly we should be able to do it. But this observation, made back in 1982 about machines that were quite different from the ones we use today, also got me thinking about how technology collides with people’s perceptions of time as we look back at it years later. Once-miraculous systems seem impossibly slow. They make contemporary software—and the hardware like smartphones running that software—seem newly extraordinary. Watching a 35-year-old program do what it was designed to do is also an implicit reminder that the best tools we have today will, before too long, seem absurd in their limitations.

And we’re able to see all this because so many people, improbably, save objects like old floppy disks and computers.  “I actually still have the SOL-20, walnut case and all,” Fallows recently told me when I asked him what ever happened to it. Scott, from the Internet Archive, says he’s been flooded with requests from people who want to share the programs they’ve held onto all these decades.

“One person, he wasn’t comfortable mailing his floppies to us, so we had to mail him the equipment,” Scott said. “And now he is bringing up one of a kind—or, I should say, extremely rare—software.” His programs, which will be added to the emulator, include original games that are highly sought-after by collectors, and at least one piece of software that was never available commercially.

“This emulation is bringing back into the froth of contemporary culture the existence of all these old programs,” Scott said. “They’re no longer just words on a page.”

Or in my case, they are words on a page. Words rendered in Apple’s familiar old Chicago typeface, materializing on the screen just the way I remember it from so very long ago.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

My Abandonware - Download Old Video Games

Lots of data

For each game, we offer all the information you are interested to know: publication year, publisher, developer, size of the game, language, review of the game, instructions to play, the game manual and, of course, the game archive that you can download for free!

Screenies!

A lot of our games have screenshots, allowing you to discover the game, or confirm it is the right game you are looking for. Many thanks to MobyGames for the most of the screenshots.

No Registration Required

Download everything you want without registration. If you want to create yourself an account, it takes less than a minute. No confirmation mail, no spam, you will be instantly logged on.

Advanced Browsing

Can't remember the name of that old action game? Only remember the name of the developer or publisher? We have different browsing methods for you, you can even search for the company name of the video game. You can also use the advanced search feature to filter games precisely.

Comment games

Add comments on the game page without registration. Leave a review, share a memory or just a thank for the game. We do not provide game support, but leave a comment if a game has a problem (wrong game, corrupted files, etc.) and we'll check it as soon as we can.

Rate games

Don't forget to rate the game you download, just click on the small hearts at the top of the page to rate. You don't have to create an account to rate a game.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
The BlueMaxima Flashpoint logo.

Adobe is killing Flash at the end of 2020, but Flash games are an important part of internet history. Thankfully, a community project called Flashpoint is stepping up to save them. Here’s how you can keep playing all your favorites for the foreseeable future.

In Memory of Adobe Flash

Adobe announced that it will “stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020.” The company encouraged content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to “new and open formats.”

The web has been moving away from Flash for years as browser-based technologies, like HTML5, WebGL, and WebAssembly, become more widespread.

Unlike Flash, these open technologies don’t require a third-party plugin. Open source technology is often held to a higher level of scrutiny. Anyone can look at source code and probe for exploits or implement the technology in their own projects.

Plugins, like Flash, the long-dead Silverlight, and the infamous Java browser plugin, operate under a closed source development model. They are (were) maintained by a single entity that seeded all updates and fixes.

In the latter half of the last decade, Flash developed a rocky reputation for its rampant security flaws, many of which were zero-day exploits that put people at serious risk.

Apple led the charge by making Flash a thing of the past. The company decided not to include support for Flash on the iPhone which forced a change that was long overdue.

Browser technologies like HTML5 emerged to replace Flash video containers. Google forced people using Chrome to run Flash in a sandbox and, later, blocked it entirely, refusing to index pages with Flash content.

In 2020, very few websites still use Flash. What does this mean for the tons of animations and interactive games that made the internet so much fun at the turn of the millennium?

How to Play Flash Games with Flashpoint

Of course, the internet won’t let all those classic Flash games disappear into the night. The solution is BlueMaxima’s Flashpoint, a free, open-source application for Windows (Mac and Linux versions are in the works).

Flashpoint provides everything you need to play classic web games. It has a library of around 38,000 web games and 2,400 animations.

Experimental Mac and Linux builds might not include support for the full catalog, though. During testing, we noticed the Mac version currently supports just over 30,000 games.

BlueMaxima "Flashpoint Launcher" menu.

If you’re on Windows, you can choose between Flashpoint Ultimate or Infinity. Ultimate is the exhaustive package. It includes the full archive of Flash content and requires around 300 GB of disk space to install.

Infinity allows you to download games on-demand as you play them and requires only around 300 MB of free space. If you have a Linux or Mac machine, you’ll have to make do with Infinity for now.

To get started, download Flashpoint for Windows or grab the experimental Mac or Linux ports. Start the Flashpoint launcher and peruse the catalog.

Click the “Games” tab to get started. On the left, you see several curated lists of games, in addition to the exhaustive “All Games” list. If you’re looking for something specific, type it in the search field at the top of the window. When you find something you want to try, double-click it and wait for Flashpoint to spring into action.

On the Mac version we used, it took a while for the game to launch. This is because Flashpoint has to first start its server, redirect any assets based on the game you’re playing, and then launch a modified browser window to display the content.

The Playable Flash Games list in Flashpoint.

If you want to jump right to the good stuff, check out the “Flashpoint Hall of Fame” curated list. You’re bound to spot a few old favorites in there, like QWOP, Portal: The Flash Version, Alien Hominid, and Yeti Sports.

How Flashpoint Works

Flashpoint is a self-styled “web game preservation project” that supports content made in Adobe Flash, Adobe Shockwave, HTML5, Java, Unity Web Player, Microsoft Silverlight, ActiveX, and other formerly popular web plugins.

The project is comprised of three main components: a web server, redirector, and launcher. These all work in combination to create the illusion that you’re accessing Flash content (and other technology) over the internet.

The game "QWOP" in Flashpoint on macOS.

This is necessary because Flash SWF files can be picky. Some content only works when it’s hosted on certain servers, and some loads resources from elsewhere. Some content tries to talk to certain servers and won’t work if it can’t find them.

Flashpoint is ultimately a preservation project. Much of the technology on which these games rely has to be emulated and hosted locally. Flashpoint takes care of all of this for you, so you can enjoy Happy Tree Friends animations and pandemic simulators like it’s 2003.

BlueMaxima is just as concerned about preserving content as it is with developing the underlying technology.

About Copyright

The Flashpoint project is primarily concerned with preservation. Since the games have been salvaged from across the web (including original source websites, the Internet Archive, and user-contributed files), the legality of all this becomes somewhat of a gray area.

The Flashpoint FAQ invites any content creators who want their games pulled from the archive to contact them. It does say the company will probably try to convince you to let them keep it for posterity’s sake, but “we aren’t unreasonable.”

The Flash Game "Canabalt" in Flashpoint.

So, are you breaking any laws? It’s difficult to say for sure. While the copyright aspect is a gray area, many creators have agreed to let their creations be included in the archive. Most of the websites that originally hosted the content are long dead. And most of the content doesn’t even work without the tricks employed behind the scenes by Flashpoint.

Many flash games could be classified as “abandonware,” i.e., software that’s been “abandoned” by its copyright owner.

Just like downloading ROMs from the internet, it’s a tricky legal area to navigate. However, like emulators themselves, there’s nothing illegal about Flashpoint as a technology.

Modern Remakes of Your Flash Favorites

Copyright uncertainty aside, some of the games in this collection have gone on to much greater things. If you have a favorite from yesteryear, there’s a good chance it’s now a mobile game or available for purchase on Steam, or other gaming services.

The following popular franchises all started as Flash games:

Many of these are in the Flashpoint archives, but they’re far from the best versions. Modern versions designed for computers, consoles, and mobiles are visually superior, have better controls and more content, and allow you to support the creators by buying them outright.

Got .SWFs? Emulate Flash with Ruffle

Flashpoint isn’t a true Flash emulator. As we mentioned previously, it uses three components (a web server, redirector, and launcher) to get Flash content to work as if it were hosted on the web. It’s not a simple case of importing an SWF file and clicking play. Some titles require a lot of tweaking and work behind the scenes before they can be used.

Ruffleis a true Flash Player emulator. You can use it both in a browser or on a desktop to play .SWF files, as if it were Adobe’s own Flash Player. To use it, though, you need some .SWF files to load—it doesn’t come with a collection of games like Flashpoint.

The Ruffle logo.

The project uses a browser technology called WebAssembly to ensure compatibility across the board. Newgrounds announced plans to use Ruffle to continue to serve as much of its content as possible after Flash is dropped for good. If you continue to use Flash content on the web, you’ll probably be using Ruffle to do so before long.

Finally, there’s always Adobe’s official standalone Flash Player, which should still be available for download in 2020 and beyond. You can use it to open and play individual SWF files outside your web browser.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Classic Mac OS Design Evolution

Thank you for visiting the Museum

This museum celebrates the heritage of technology we've all grown up with. Please help us maintain and grow the museum by making a small donation -- buy us a coffee? Thank you so much!

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Mac OS System 1 (1984)

Mac OS System 1 welcome screen (1984)
Source: uwa.edu.au

Mac OS System 1 welcome screen (1984)
Source: uwa.edu.au

Mac OS System 1 desktop (1984)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 1 Finder (1984)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 1 Control Panel (1984)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 1 system error bomb (1984)
Source: uwa.edu.au

Mac OS System 3 (1986)

Mac OS System 4 (1987)

Mac OS System 6 (1988)

Mac OS System 7 - Colors At Last! (1991)

Mac OS System 7.5 (1994)

Mac OS System 7.5 welcome screen (1994)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 7.5 About This Macintosh Dialog, System Folder, and Note Pad (1994)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 7.5 Jigsaw Puzzle and Desktop Pattern Switcher (1994)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 7.5 Control Panels (1994)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS System 7.5 General Controls (1994)
Source: Version Museum

Mac OS 8 (1997)

Apple dropped the word System from the OS starting with version 8.

Mac OS 9 (1999)

Next: Mac OS X

See our illustrated design evolution of Mac OS X which launched in 2001.

Also, if you're an Apple fan, see our article on what Apple.com used to look like - 25 years of design history of the Apple.com website.

Do you like seeing nostalgic stuff like this everyday? Follow Version Museum on Twitter or Instagram.
Please help support our museum hosting costs by making a small donation -- buy us a coffee! Thank you so much!

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Scroll up to the top.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to Install Applications on Your Mac

How To + Software & Apps

Posted on March 23rd, 2021 by Craig Grannell and Kirk McElhearn

Installing new apps on your Mac should be straightforward. However, it can sometimes be confusing – installation methods are varied, and you’ll occasionally see scary warnings. In this article, we’ll show you the various ways you can install apps on Mac, and tell you about the warnings you may encounter.

How to install apps from the Mac App Store

The Mac App Store is one of the best ways to get and install apps on your Mac. It has its pros and cons, but for ease of use, it gets the highest rating.

Select App Store from the Apple menu and the Mac App Store will open. When signed in with your Apple ID, you can download apps: click Get and then install app for a free app, or one with in-app purchases, or click the price label for a paid one. In-app purchases are indicated next to the Get button, if there are any. You’ll need to confirm payment by entering your Apple ID/password.

Apple reviews every Mac App Store app (and update) prior to release, minimizing the likelihood of problems.

The App Store is also a great way to centralize your app updates. In System Preferences > Software Update, you can choose to have App Store updates installed automatically.

How to install Mac apps downloaded from third-party websites

Apple imposes limitations on developers, meaning some cannot – or choose not to – release their apps on the Mac App Store. Reasoning varies from a lack of deep system access for utilities to app creators wanting the ability to immediately issue updates rather than having them await Mac App Store review.

If you decide to download app installers from the Internet, only do so from reputable sources. Ideally, download from developer websites (like Intego’s) and not from app listing websites.

Unless you’ve changed your browser’s settings, downloaded installers will be sent to ~/Downloads, and they come in a variety of forms:

DMG files are mountable disk images. When you double click a DMG file, a Finder window opens. DMGs may contain an installer that itself must be opened, after which point you follow on-screen instructions. Most, though, simply contain a copy of the app.

Do not run the app from inside the DMG – instead drag it to your Applications folder. A folder shortcut may be provided to make this easier. When you’re done, unmount the DMG by clicking the eject icon next to its name in the Finder sidebar, or by Ctrl-clicking inside the DMG’s window and selecting Eject.

ZIP files (and, very occasionally, RARs) are archives that tend to contain just an app. Again, drag the app to your Applications folder before opening it. In part, this keeps things tidy, but some apps won’t run unless they’re in that folder. (Some will offer to move themselves when opened from the wrong location.)

PKG files are installation packages that contain scripts to direct installation, and files to be installed. These lead you through a multi-step installation process, and tend to be used for apps and utilities that require additional components, system services, and/or files to be placed elsewhere on your computer. (This is automated; you essentially click a few times to allow the PKG to do its thing.)

Once you’ve installed your apps, you can delete the DMG, ZIP, or PKG files, but you may want to keep them, if the apps are large, and your bandwidth is limited, in case you need to reinstall the apps, or install them on another Mac.

How to install Mac apps from third-party app stores

There are some third-party equivalents to the Mac App Store. They’re typically specialized in nature, and comprise a core app that when launched enables you to manage which products from the service you install on your Mac. Games store Steam is the most popular. It assumes you’ll launch purchased games from within its app rather than /Applications, although it is possible to create desktop shortcuts you can subsequently move.

A more Mac-like example of a third-party app store is Setapp. It’s sort of like a curated Netflix for apps – for a monthly fee, you get access to dozens of hand-picked apps. Installed apps are placed within /Applications/Setapp. Don’t manually mess about with these; use Setapp’s interface for subsequent management.

Clear warnings when installing apps

When installing and launching apps, your Mac may display security warnings. For example, when you download an app from the Internet, your Mac will ask for confirmation before you run it the first time. (This assumes that in the Security & Privacy pane of System Preferences you allow apps downloaded from identified developers. That is the default setting; it can be adjusted by clicking the lock, entering your admin password, and selecting the relevant radio button.)

You may also get dialogs from apps, the first time you launch them, requesting access to things like your Downloads folder, camera, microphone, and other elements.

In some cases, such as granting access to your Downloads folder, you merely need to click OK on a dialog. But in others, such as the example above, you have go to System Preferences to explicitly grant permission. These settings are recorded in System Preferences > Privacy, and there is a whole column of areas where you can grant or deny permission to apps. When granting permission, you need to click the padlock, enter your password, then check the appropriate boxes.

In the General pane of System Preferences is a setting to allow apps downloaded from the App Store, or from the App Store and identified developers. These latter are developers who have accounts with Apple, and sign their apps with an Apple-provided certificate, to ensure their provenance.

But there are times when you may want to open apps from unidentified develops. To do this, select the app in the Finder, right-click or Control-click, then choose Open.

If you try to open an app from an unidentified developer by double-clicking, you can also open it by going to System Preferences > General, where there will be a button, near the bottom of the window, saying Open Anyway. Click this button to open the app. The button is visible for about an hour after you first launch the app.

You won’t need to do this after the first time you launch an app; your Mac remembers your settings.

 

How can I learn more?

Each week on the Intego Mac Podcast, Intego’s Mac security experts discuss the latest Apple news, security and privacy stories, and offer practical advice on getting the most out of your Apple devices. Be sure to follow the podcast to make sure you don’t miss any episodes.

You can also subscribe to our e-mail newsletter and keep an eye here on Mac Security Blog for the latest Apple security and privacy news. And don’t forget to follow Intego on your favorite social media channels: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

About Craig Grannell

Craig Grannell is a technology writer, mostly specialising in Macs, iOS, apps, and games. He’s been immersed in all things Apple for over 20 years, and enamoured with computers since getting his hands on a VIC-20 as a kid. He also has a Korg Gadget addiction. Send help. Or alternatively, visit his website, craiggrannell.com, and follow him on Twitter at @craiggrannell. View all posts by Craig Grannell → This entry was posted in How To, Software & Apps and tagged applications, Mac. Bookmark the permalink.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
Mac Game Archives

My Abandonware - Download Old Video Games

Lots of data

For each game, we offer all the information you are interested to know: publication year, publisher, developer, size of the game, language, review of the game, instructions to play, the game manual and, of course, the game archive that you can download for free!

Screenies!

A lot of our games have screenshots, allowing you to discover the game, or confirm it is Mac Game Archives right game you are looking for. Many thanks to MobyGames for the most of the screenshots.

No Registration Required

Download everything you want without registration. If you want to create yourself an account, it takes less than a minute. No confirmation mail, no spam, Mac Game Archives, you will Mac Game Archives instantly logged on.

Advanced Browsing

Can't remember the name of that old action game? Only remember the name of the developer or publisher? We have different browsing methods for you, you can even search for the company name of the video game. You can also use the advanced search feature to filter games precisely.

Comment games

Add comments on the game page without registration. Mac Game Archives a review, Mac Game Archives, share a memory or just a thank for the game. We do not provide game support, but leave a comment if a game has a problem (wrong game, corrupted files, etc.) and we'll check it as soon as we can.

Rate games

Don't forget to rate the game you download, just click on the small hearts at the top of the page to rate. You don't have Mac Game Archives create an account to rate a game.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Play Blue Archive on PC

Blue Archive

Page Modified On: November 11, 2021

Blue Archive is a simulation game developed by NEXON Company. BlueStacks app player is the best platform to play this Android game on your PC or Mac for an immersive gaming experience.


Download Blue Archive on PC and play your role as the advisor to the Federal Investigation Club. This role and task is huge, Mac Game Archives, as the club is in Kivotos and is home to numerous academies that have become clustered together. In this game, you are to help resolve the endless incidents in Kivotos using charming allies that are full of personality and can build special memories.


Download Blue Archive on PC and discover a unique miracle Mac Game Archives the wild daily lives of these characters through their relationship stories, revealing their innermost feelings. This is an exciting story that can get you curious about how everything unfolds, Mac Game Archives. Generally, Blue Archive comes with an unpredictable main story about a girl’s love, friendship, and thrilling military action.


While playing this game, you can interact with fellow gamers using the in-game messenger, Momo Talk. And that’s not all with this game! You can also play 3D real-time battles with cute characters having detailed animations, Mac Game Archives. So, what are you waiting for? Download Blue Archive on PC now and get started.

Game Features

Enhancements

  • Macros Mac Game Archives
  • Multi Instance
  • Multi Instance Sync
  • Script
  • Game controls
  • Enhancements
Macros

Mac Game Archives Automate the predictable in Blue Archive and transform your gameplay with Macros. Get access to inventive Macros in the BlueStacks Macro Community

Multi Instance

Play Blue Archive on one window, Mac Game Archives. And chat with your friend on the other. Press CTRL + Shift + 8 to open the Multi-Instance Manager. And start creating fresh instances or clone an existing one.

Multi Instance Sync

Play Blue Archive with the power of Multi-Instance Sync. Replicate what you are doing on the main instance on all other instances. Level up faster, play more.

Script

Script your way to gaming glory in Blue Archive with BlueStacks Script. Write and run a set of commands to automate repeated tasks. Trigger Mac Game Archives command by assigning it to any key.

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How to Download and Play Blue Archive on PC Mac Game Archives

  • Mac Game Archives Download and install BlueStacks on your PC

  • Complete Google sign-in to access the Play Store, or do it later

  • Look for Blue Archive in the search bar at the top right corner

  • Click to install Blue Archive from the search results

  • Complete Google sign-in (if you skipped step 2) to install Blue Archive

  • Click Mac Game Archives Blue Archive icon on Mac Game Archives home screen to start playing

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Enjoy 3D battles with cute characters in Blue Archive with BlueStacks.

BlueStacks is an app player that allows you to run several Android apps on a PC and play large games conveniently. Experience amazing interactions and battles on a larger screen, and don’t get stuck on your device’s small screen. Enjoy every moment on a larger screen with BlueStacks.

BlueStacks comes with different unique features making it the most preferred app player for running all your Android apps and games, Mac Game Archives. All the features work unitedly to deliver the most enhanced gaming experience on a PC.

Download Blue Archive using BlueStacks 5 on at least a 4GB RAM PC to experience the largest Mac Game Archives most diverse app and game library in an app player. With this new BlueStacks, you can now find more unique titles and discover better games and apps from over two million options, giving you a better immersive experience.

This new and improved app player, BlueStacks does something even better Mac Game Archives its features, Mac Game Archives. For instance, Mac Game Archives, it comes with the new Long Flight feature that improves the stability of gameplay by a mile. This means you can now play games for long hours without any fear of losing quality, even FPS (Frame Per Second).

Click to Install

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
The BlueMaxima Flashpoint logo.

Adobe is killing Flash at the end of 2020, but Flash games are an important part of internet history. Thankfully, a community project called Flashpoint is stepping up to save them. Here’s how you can keep playing all your favorites for the foreseeable future.

In Memory of Adobe Flash

Adobe announced that it will “stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020.” Mac Game Archives company encouraged content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to “new and open formats.”

The web has been moving away from Flash for years as xpand 2 vst crack mac Archives technologies, like HTML5, WebGL, Mac Game Archives, and WebAssembly, become more widespread.

Unlike Flash, these open technologies don’t require a third-party plugin. Open source technology is often held to a higher level of scrutiny. Anyone can look at source code and probe for exploits or implement the technology in their own projects.

Plugins, like Flash, the long-dead Silverlight, and the infamous Java browser plugin, operate under a closed source development model. They are (were) maintained by a single entity that seeded all updates and fixes.

In the latter half of the last decade, Flash developed a rocky Mac Game Archives for its rampant security flaws, many of which were zero-day exploits that put people at serious risk.

Apple led the charge by making Flash a thing of the past. The company decided not to include support for Flash on the iPhone which forced a change that was long overdue.

Browser technologies like HTML5 emerged to replace Flash video containers. Google forced people using Chrome to run Flash in a sandbox and, later, blocked it entirely, refusing to index pages with Flash content.

In 2020, very few websites still use Flash. What does this mean for the tons of animations and interactive games that made the internet so much fun at the turn of the millennium?

How to Play Flash Games with Flashpoint

Of course, the internet won’t let all those classic Flash games disappear into the night. The solution is BlueMaxima’s Flashpoint, a free, Mac Game Archives, open-source application for Windows (Mac and Linux versions are in the works).

Flashpoint provides everything you need to play classic web games. It has a library of around 38,000 web games and 2,400 animations.

Experimental Mac and Linux builds might not include support for the full catalog, though. During testing, we noticed the Mac version currently supports just over 30,000 games.

BlueMaxima "Flashpoint Launcher" menu.

If you’re on Windows, you can choose between Flashpoint Ultimate or Infinity. Ultimate is the exhaustive package. It includes the full archive of Flash content and requires around 300 GB of disk space to install.

Infinity allows you to download games on-demand as you play them and requires only around 300 MB of free space. If you have a Linux or Mac machine, you’ll have to make do with Infinity for now.

To get started, download Flashpoint for Windows or grab the experimental Mac Mac Game Archives Linux ports, Mac Game Archives. Start the Flashpoint launcher and peruse the catalog.

Click the “Games” tab to get started. On the left, you see several curated lists of games, in addition Mac Game Archives the exhaustive “All Games” list. If you’re looking for something specific, type it in the search field at the top of the window. When you find something you want to try, double-click it and wait for Flashpoint to spring into action.

On the Mac version we used, it took a while for the game to launch. This is because Flashpoint has to first start its server, Mac Game Archives, redirect any assets based on the game you’re playing, and then launch a modified browser window to display the content.

The Playable Flash Games list in Flashpoint.

If you want to jump right to the good stuff, check out the “Flashpoint Hall of Fame” curated list. You’re bound to spot a few old favorites in there, like QWOP, Portal: The Flash Version, Alien Hominid, Mac Game Archives, and Yeti Sports.

How Flashpoint Works

Flashpoint is a self-styled “web game preservation project” that supports content made in Adobe Flash, Adobe Shockwave, HTML5, Java, Unity Mac Game Archives Player, Mac Game Archives, Microsoft Silverlight, ActiveX, Mac Game Archives, and other formerly popular web plugins.

The project is comprised of three main components: a web server, redirector, and launcher. These all Mac Game Archives in combination to create the illusion that you’re accessing Flash content (and other technology) over the internet.

The game "QWOP" in Flashpoint on macOS.

This is necessary because Flash SWF files can be picky. Some content only works when it’s hosted on certain servers, and some loads resources from elsewhere. Some content tries to talk to certain servers and won’t work if it can’t find them.

Flashpoint is ultimately a preservation project. Much of the technology on which these games rely has to be emulated and hosted locally. Flashpoint takes care of all of this for you, so you can enjoy Happy Tree Friends animations and pandemic simulators like it’s 2003.

BlueMaxima is just as concerned about preserving content as it is with developing the underlying technology.

About Copyright

The Flashpoint project is primarily concerned with preservation. Since the games have been salvaged from across the web (including original source websites, Mac Game Archives, the Internet Archive, and user-contributed files), the legality of all this becomes somewhat of a gray area.

The Flashpoint FAQ invites any content creators who want their games pulled from the archive to contact them. It does say the company will probably try to convince you to let them keep it for posterity’s sake, but “we aren’t unreasonable.”

The Flash Game "Canabalt" in Flashpoint.Mac Game Archives, are you breaking any laws? It’s difficult Mac Game Archives say for sure. While the copyright aspect is a gray area, many creators have agreed to let their creations be included in the archive. Most of the websites that originally hosted the content are long dead. And most of the content doesn’t even work without the tricks employed behind the scenes by Flashpoint.

Many flash games could be classified as “abandonware,” i.e., software that’s been “abandoned” by its copyright owner.

Just like downloading ROMs from the internet, it’s a tricky legal area to navigate. However, like emulators themselves, Mac Game Archives, there’s nothing illegal Mac Game Archives Flashpoint as a technology.

Modern Remakes of Your Flash Favorites

Copyright uncertainty aside, Mac Game Archives, some of the games in this collection have gone on to much greater things. If you have a favorite from yesteryear, there’s a good chance it’s now a mobile game or available for purchase on Steam, or other gaming services.

The following popular franchises all started as Flash games:

Many of these are in the Flashpoint archives, but they’re far from the best versions. Modern versions designed for computers, consoles, and mobiles are visually superior, have better controls and more content, and allow you to support the creators by buying them outright.

Got .SWFs? Emulate Flash with Ruffle

Flashpoint isn’t a true Flash emulator. As we mentioned previously, it uses three components (a web server, redirector, and launcher) to get Flash content to work as if it were hosted on the web. It’s not a simple case of importing an SWF file and clicking play. Some titles require a lot of tweaking and work behind the scenes before they can be used.

Ruffleis a true Flash Player emulator. You can use it both in a browser or on a desktop to play .SWF files, as if it were Adobe’s own Flash Player. To use it, though, you need some .SWF files to load—it doesn’t come with a collection of games like Flashpoint.

The Ruffle logo.

The project uses a browser technology called WebAssembly to ensure compatibility across the board. Newgrounds announced plans to use Ruffle to continue to serve as much of its content as possible after Flash is dropped for good. If you continue to use Flash content on the web, you’ll probably be using Ruffle to do so before long.

Finally, there’s always Adobe’s official standalone Flash Player, which should still be available for download in 2020 and beyond. You can use it to open and play individual SWF files outside your web browser.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Unity download archive

Unity ID

A Unity ID allows you to buy and/or subscribe to Unity products and services, Mac Game Archives, shop in the Asset Store and participate in the Unity community.

Log inCreate a Unity ID

From this page you can download the previous versions of Unity for both Unity Personal and Pro (if you have a Pro license, enter in your key when prompted after installation). Please note that we don’t support downgrading a project to an older editor version. However, you can import projects into a new editor version. We advise you to back up your project before converting and check the console log for any errors or warnings after importing.

Long Term Support releases

The LTS stream is for users who wish to continue to develop and ship their games/content and stay on a stable version for an extended period.

Download LTS releases

4 Feb, 2021

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Outlook 2016 for Mac includes a new feature called one-click archiving. This feature allows you to quickly move an item from your Inbox or another folder to an archive folder. An archived item (or items) remains accessible, Mac Game Archives, but doesn't clutter your Inbox.

Archive messages with a single click

You can archive messages in any of the email accounts that you've connected to Outlook 2016 for Mac. These include Exchange (version 2016 and later), Microsoft 365, Outlook.com, Hotmail, iCloud, Mac Game Archives, Google, and Yahoo!

  1. Choose one or more messages in your folder to archive.

  2. On the ribbon, choose Archive.

    or  New Outlook for Mac interface Archive icon.

    If you don't see the Archive button and you're using the newest Outlook for Mac interface, you may need to customize your toolbar.

  3. As soon as you choose Archive, Mac Game Archives, messages are immediately moved to the archive folder you've specified. If you archive a message by mistake, Mac Game Archives, go to the archive folder and move the message back Mac Game Archives your Inbox.

First time using the archive?

If you haven't previously set up an archive folder for an email account, you may get this prompt:

This message displays the first time you use the Archive button in Outlook 2016 for Mac

Choose one of the following:

  • Continue. A new folder will appear in your folder list for that email account. You'll have to repeat this process to create an archive folder for each of your email accounts. The folder will be called Archive for Microsoft 365, Outlook.com, Mac Game Archives, Hotmail, iCloud, Google, Mac Game Archives, and Yahoo! accounts. The archive folder for Gmail is called All Mail.

    Side by side view of Exchange and Gmail folder lists with archive folders highlighted

  • Choose another folder. Select any of your existing Mac Game Archives for the archive.

If you don't get that prompt, you're email should automatically have gone to the Archive folder.

See Also

Add an email account to Outlook

Archive messages in Outlook (for Windows)

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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