Research guides - The National Archives

Category Archives: Office

Category Archives: Office

The National Archives is a non-ministerial government department. Its parent department is to four letters, such as WO for the War Office; a series or class number. There are two ways to look for a record using Discovery, searching or browsing. research guidance to find relevant department reference codes or record. our blog. Find out what's new at edinburgh assay. Category FourEdinburgh Assay Office. Search for: Category Four. Life after Brexit. 24th September

Category Archives: Office - opinion, actual

Records management for public bodies

The role of PRONI in providing records management and guidance to public bodies including the creation of the Northern Ireland Records Management Standard and guidance for financial records.

PRONI and records management

Due to the demands of recent legislation, in particular the Data Protection Act , the Freedom of Information Act (FOI) , and long standing legislation such as the Public Records Act (NI) , the records management function in public authorities needs a large investment in time, energy and resources.

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) continues to be at the forefront of developments in the field of records and information management.

Members of PRONI's records management staff provide advice and guidance to those public servants and professionals who deal with the records management function in their respective organisations.

Northern Ireland Records Management Standard

Seeing the need to raise the importance of records management, in consultation with staff from the Northern Ireland government departments, PRONI drew up the Northern Ireland Record Management Standard (NIRMS) in and updated in

This document gives practical advice on all types of records management issues pertinent to public record-keeping in Northern Ireland.
Issues covered include:

Guidance on retention and disposal schedules has been updated and details the current position for public authorities.  This document replaces the earlier guidelines.

The guidance must be read with the Code of Practice on the Management of Records under Section 46 of the Freedom of Information Act.  The Code highlights sound record keeping practices that must be followed by public authorities.

Transfer of records

Guidance has been produced is to assist public bodies in Northern Ireland to manage the transfer of official paper records to the custody of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.   

Since the introduction of the Freedom of Information Act , new documents have been introduced by PRONI in order to meet the s46 code of the FOI Act. The PR 14 forms and respective guidance was issued after consultation with the Northern Ireland Departmental Information Managers and Departmental Records Officers. These forms and guidance have recently been updated on account of the implementation of the 20 year rule.

PR 14 historical 

For the transfer of historical records to PRONI, that is those that are more than 20 years old as defined by the FOI Act.  (Guidance for reviewers on filling in the PR 14 historical forms).

PR 14

For the transfer of records to PRONI, that are less than 20 years old. (Guidance for reviewers on filling in the PR 14 forms).

Financial records – new guidance

In light of recent record keeping recommendations issued by the Northern Ireland Audit Office and the Northern Ireland Public Accounts Committee, PRONI advises that publicly funded bodies which have been under an investigation that resulted in significant criticism or public prosecution should retain the relevant financial records for a period of 10 years from the date that the investigation ended. In a case, where the public body ceases to exist, the funding department is to take the necessary steps to secure all relevant documents and make sure they are preserved.

As a result of the above recommendation, public bodies that have a disposal schedule signed off by PRONI will be required to set aside the current agreed disposal action for any records that fall into the above category and hold such records for the extended period. Disposal schedules being reviewed or changed will incorporate the above recommendation.

Guidance for Public Inquiries

Public inquiries are conducted on behalf of NI Departments or the NI Executive, which means that records created or sent to the Inquiry are ‘public records’ as defined by the Public Records Act (NI)   PRONI has published guidance for the management of information and records created during the course of public inquiries held in Northern Ireland.

Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
Hospital Records Database

The National Archives (United Kingdom)

Repository of archival information for the United Kingdom

Logo of The National Archives of the United shoppingdowntown.us
FormedApril&#;&#;()
JurisdictionEngland and Wales, Government of the United Kingdom
HeadquartersKew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU
51°28′52″N0°16′46″W / °N °W / ; Coordinates: 51°28′52″N0°16′46″W / °N °W / ;
Employees
Annual budget£ million (–)[1]
Ministers responsible
Non-ministerial department executive
  • Jeff James, Chief Executive and Keeper of the Public Records
Parent departmentDepartment for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Child agencies
  • Office of Public Sector Information
  • Her Majesty's Stationery Office
Key document
Websiteshoppingdowntown.usEdit this at Wikidata
The National Archives building at Kew

The National Archives (TNA, Welsh: Yr Archifau Cenedlaethol) is a non-ministerial government department.[2] Its parent department is the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.[3] It is the official archive of the UK government and for England and Wales; and "guardian of some of the nation's most iconic documents, dating back more than 1, years."[4] There are separate national archives for Scotland (the National Records of Scotland) and Northern Ireland (the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland).

TNA was formerly four separate organisations: the Public Record Office (PRO), the Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) and Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO). The Public Record Office still exists as a legal entity, as the enabling legislation has not been modified,[5][6] and documents held by the institution thus continue to be cited by many scholars as part of the PRO.[7] Since , TNA has also hosted the former UK Statute Law Database, now known as shoppingdowntown.us

It is institutional policy to include the definite article, with an initial capital letter, in its name (hence "The National Archives", abbreviated as TNA) but this practice is not always followed in the non-specialist media.

The department is the responsibility of the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Tourism; a minister in the Government of the United Kingdom.[8]

Location[edit]

The National Archives is based in Kew in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in south-west London. The building was opened in as an additional home for the public records, which were held in a building on Chancery Lane. The site was originally a World War I hospital, which was later used by several government departments.[9] It is near to Kew Gardens Underground station.

Until its closure in March , the Family Records Centre in Islington was run jointly by The National Archives and the General Register Office. The National Archives has an additional office in Norwich, which is primarily for former OPSI staff. There is also an additional record storage facility (DeepStore[10]) in the worked-out parts of Winsford Rock Salt Mine, Winsford, Cheshire.

History[edit]

For earlier history, see Public Record Office.

The National Archives was created in by combining the Public Record Office and the Historical Manuscripts Commission and is a non-ministerial department reporting to the Minister of State for digital policy.

On 31 October , The National Archives merged with the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI), which itself also contained Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) which was previously a part of the Cabinet Office. The name remained The National Archives.

Chief Executive and Keeper[edit]

Key roles[edit]

A manuscript and seals being examined at the archives

TNA claims it is "at the heart of information policy—setting standards and supporting innovation in information and records management across the UK, and providing a practical framework of best practice for opening up and encouraging the re-use of public sector information.[13] This work helps inform today's decisions and ensure that they become tomorrow's permanent record." It has a number of key roles in information policy:

  • Policy – advising government on information practice and policy, on issues from record creation through to its reuse
  • Selection – selecting which documents to store
  • Preservation – ensuring the documents remain in as good a condition as possible
  • Access – providing the public with the opportunity to view the documents
  • Advice – advising the public and other archives and archivists around the world on how to care for documents
  • Intellectual property management – TNA (via OPSI and HMSO) manages crown copyright for the UK
  • Regulation – ensuring that other public sector organisations adhere to both the public records act and the PSI reuse regulations.

Sector leadership[edit]

The National Archives (and before it the Public Record Office) has long had a role of oversight and leadership for the entire archives sector and archives profession in the UK, including local government and non-governmental archives. Under the Public Records Act it is responsible for overseeing the appropriate custody of certain non-governmental public records in England and Wales.[14] Under the Historical Manuscripts Commission Warrant it has responsibility for investigating and reporting on non-governmental records and archives of all kinds throughout the United Kingdom.[15] In October , when the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council was wound up, TNA took over its responsibilities in respect of archives in England, including providing information and advice to ministers on archives policy. The National Archives now sees this part of its role as being "to enhance the 'archival health of the nation'".[16]

Collections[edit]

Types of records[edit]

Entrance gates to The National Archives from Ruskin Avenue: the notched vertical elements were inspired by medieval tally sticks.

The National Archives is Her Majesty's Government's official archive, "containing years of history from Domesday Book to the present", with records from parchment and paper scrolls through to digital files and archived websites.[17] The material held at Kew includes the following:

  • Documents from the central courts of law from the twelfth century onwards, including the Court of King's Bench, the Court of Common Pleas, the Court of Chancery, the Court of Exchequer, the Supreme Court of Judicature, the Central Criminal Court, Assizes, and many other courts
  • Medieval, early modern and modern records of central government
  • A large and disparate collection of maps, plans and architectural drawings
  • Records for family historians including wills, naturalisation certificates and criminal records
  • Service and operational records of the armed forces War Office, Admiralty etc.
  • Foreign Office and Colonial Office correspondence and files
  • Cabinet papers and Home Office records
  • Statistics of the Board of Trade
  • The surviving records of (mainly) the English railway companies, transferred from the British Railways Record Office

There is also a museum, which displays key documents such as Domesday Book and has exhibitions on various topics using material from the collections.[18]

Access to documents[edit]

Researchers at the archive
Researcher's point of view: Document open at assigned table, with foam supports to prevent binding from breaking

The collections held by the National Archives can be searched using their online catalogue.[19]

Entrance to The National Archives is free.[20] Anybody aged 16 or over can access the original documents at the Kew site, after producing two acceptable proofs of identity and being issued a free reader's ticket.[21]

The reading room has terminals from which documents can be ordered up from secure storage areas by their reference number. The reference number is composed of three sections: the department code of up to four letters, such as WO for the War Office; a series or class number, for the "subcategory" or collection that the document comes from; and an individual document number. Documents can also be ordered in advance.[22]

Once a document has been ordered, The National Archives aims to get it to the reader within 45 minutes (assuming it is kept at Kew rather than at their second repository, "Deep Store" – a former salt mine in Cheshire: it can take 2–3 days for files to be retrieved from the latter). Special arrangements are in place for readers wishing to retrieve large groups of files.

A reader's ticket is not needed to access records on microform or online. Frequently accessed documents such as the Abdication Papers have been put on microfilm, as have records for two million First World War soldiers. The originals of the latter were stored in a warehouse in London along with four million others, but incendiary bombs dropped on the warehouse in the Second World War started a fire in which most were destroyed. The surviving third were largely water or fire-damaged and thus acquired the colloquial name of the "Burnt Documents." Because they were mostly too fragile for public access, they were put on microfilm with the aid of the Heritage Lottery Fund. They have now also been digitised and are available on the Ancestry website.[23]

Some of the most popular documents have now been digitised and are available to download from Discovery, for a fee of £ per file,[24] or through co-branded services called licensed Internet associates (LIA) as pay per view or part of their subscription service.[25] A list of records online is available under the records, catalogues and online records menu on The National Archives' website.[26]

All of the open census records have been digitised, and there are also significant other sources online, such as wills proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, – Researchers are encouraged to check the online services first, to see if they can get what they want online. If a document is available online, The National Archives' policy is to encourage people to use the digital copy and not the original, even if they come to Kew, in order to protect the original from damage.

Storage[edit]

Moveable shelving in one of the more modern repositories

The documents are stored on mobile shelving – double-sided shelves, which are pushed together so that there is no aisle between them. A large handle on the end of each shelf allows them to be moved along tracks in the floor to create an aisle when needed.

They are generally stored in acid-free folders or boxes.

In the event of a fire The National Archives would be clearly unable to use sprinklers for fear of ruining its holdings, and so when the building is evacuated, argon gas is released into the air-tight repositories.

Other services[edit]

The National Archives also provides services to help users in their research and also find collections beyond those it holds.

Education[edit]

National Archives at the London University School of Advanced Studies History Day, November

The National Archives' education web page is a free online resource for teaching and learning history, aimed at teachers and students.[27] Users can select time periods they are interested in, from the medieval era to the present day. Each time period contains sub-topics with various materials that can be used as teaching tools for teachers.[28] Resources for students focus primarily on tips for research and writing using archival materials.[29]

"Access to Archives"[edit]

Access to Archives (also known as A2A)[30] is a database containing details of archival collections held in many different archive repositories in England and Wales.[31] As of March , there are no more plans to add additional collections to A2A due to lack of funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the changing financial priorities of The National Archives, but existing entries can still be updated.[32] The A2A database was transferred to The National Archives with a new platform with a simpler interface to ensure its availability.[33]

National Register of Archives[edit]

A researcher at the archives

The National Register of Archives (NRA)[34] is the central point for the collection and circulation of information about the content and nature of archival manuscripts relating to British history.[35] It contains published and unpublished lists and catalogues describing archival collections in the UK and overseas: currently over 44, such catalogues are included.[36] The register can be consulted in the National Archives reading room and the index used to be searchable as an online database on the National Archives web site.[35]

The information is collected in a variety of ways. TNA is sent hard-copy catalogues from archive repositories holding records relating to British history. These are kept in the reading room at The National Archives and indexed in the online database. TNA conducts an annual survey of archive repositories and records all new accessions, and the accession lists[37] are also available on TNA's website. Information is also obtained from surveys and guides to archival collections, and other publications.[35]

The Register includes name indexes to its contents (covering corporate names, personal names, family names, and place names); but not subject or thematic indexes.[35] Where the catalogues are themselves available online the indexes provide direct electronic links; but many still exist in hard copy only (often as unpublished "grey literature"), and it remains necessary for the researcher to visit either TNA or the specific repository in order to consult them.

A separate National Register of Archives for Scotland is maintained at the National Archives of Scotland, but its contents are duplicated within the NRA at Kew.

ARCHON directory[edit]

ARCHON Directory is a database of contact details for archive repositories in the UK and institutions elsewhere in the world which have substantial collections of manuscripts relating to British history.[38]

"Your Archives"[edit]

Your Archives[39] is a wiki for the National Archives on-line community which was launched in May ; it was closed for editing on 30 September in preparation of archiving on the Government web archive.[40] The contributions are made by users to give additional information to that which is available on the other services provided by the National Archives, including the catalogue, research guides, documentonline and National Register of Archive.[41] Your Archives encourages users to create articles not only about historical records held by the National Archives, but those held in other archive repositories.[42]

Databases[edit]

The National Archives also hosts several databases on types of records including hospital records;[43] migration records;[44] and manorial records.[45][46]

Working with the Wellcome Library, TNA has made hospital records available via the Hospital Records Database. The Hospital Records Database has not been updated since , and there are no current updates occurring as of [47]

The Manorial Documents Register includes records relating to manors located in England and Wales. Digitization of the records is on-going as of [48]

Civil Pages[edit]

The National Archives operates the Civil Pages project on behalf of the Cabinet Office, operating as an online directory for the civil service, facilitating working together and providing a means of sharing knowledge securely between government departments.[49]

Smartphone applications[edit]

In January The National Archives, in conjunction with historian Nick Barratt and smartphone applications development studio RevelMob,[50] developed its first Old Money iPhone app,[51] which uses historic price data from documents held at The National Archives to see what a sum of money from the past (from ) would be worth today and the spending power it would have commanded at the time.[52]

In September , TNA's museum began using QRpedia codes, which can be scanned by smartphone users in order to retrieve information about exhibits from Wikipedia.[53]

Blogs and podcasts[edit]

TNA regularly posts blogs to its website. Posts cover a wide range of topics, from specific events and time periods to features on holdings in TNA, as well as information on the archive's operations.[54]

The "Archives Media Player" section holds videos and podcasts created and posted by TNA. Videos and audio are not posted as regularly as TNA's blog.[55]

The Future: Archives Inspire –19[edit]

Archives Inspire[56] is a strategy document that sets out the goals and priorities of the organisation over four years, from onwards.

Forgeries discovered in [edit]

In June , journalist Ben Fenton of The Daily Telegraph received an email from a colleague asking him to investigate documents held at TNA that alleged that a British intelligence agent had, on the orders of Winston Churchill, murdered Heinrich Himmler, the head of the NaziSS, in [57] The three documents had come to prominence after being revealed by author Martin Allen in his book Himmler's Secret War.[57]

On viewing photographs of the documents, Fenton's suspicions were immediately aroused by the fact that such a controversial policy was casually committed to paper, even to the extent of naming the assassin, and by the use of colourful language.[57] Viewing the original documents the next day, Fenton spotted what looked like pencil marks beneath the signature on one of them. This confirmed his suspicions and, along with his experience of analysing historic documents, it enabled him to persuade The Daily Telegraph to pay for forensic analysis.[57]

TNA staff took four files, along with authenticated copies of the authors' handwriting, to Dr Audrey Giles, a former head of Scotland Yard's Questioned Documents Unit, who confirmed that the documents were forgeries. One letter head had been printed on a laser printer and all had tear marks where they had been threaded on to the security tags. Further investigations by TNA staff revealed that the counterfeit documents contained errors, breaches of protocol and etiquette which their supposed authors would not have committed.[57]

After his account of the deception appeared in the newspaper, Fenton was contacted by a German academic, Ernst Haiger, who informed him of his own suspicions over other TNA documents cited in an earlier Allen book. Examination by TNA experts led to more than a dozen documents being identified as suspicious and submitted to Home Office specialists for examination. When they, too, were declared forgeries, the TNA called in the police.[57]

In the addendum to the later American edition of the book (which acknowledged that the papers were forged), Allen theorised that, some time after he saw the documents, they had been removed and replaced with clumsily forged replicas, to cast doubt upon his discoveries.[57]

In all, twenty-nine forged documents were discovered, each typed on one of only four typewriters. They were placed in twelve separate files, and cited at least once in one or more of Allen's three books. According to the experts at TNA, documents now shown to be forgeries supported controversial arguments central to each of Allen's books: in Hidden Agenda, five documents now known to be forged helped justify his claim that the Duke of Windsor betrayed military secrets to Hitler; in The Hitler/Hess Deception, thirteen forged papers supported Allen's contention that, in , British intelligence used members of the Royal Family to fool the Nazis into thinking Britain was on the verge of a pro-German putsch; in Himmler's Secret War, twenty-two counterfeit papers also underpinned the book's core claims that British intelligence played mind games with Himmler to encourage him to betray Hitler from onwards, and that ultimately they murdered the SS chief.[57]

In the Crown Prosecution Service announced that it was "not in the public interest" to prosecute the only suspect questioned by police. Allen's health problems had prevented the police questioning him for nine months, after which he told them he was wholly innocent. In a December response to questions from Norman Baker MP, the Solicitor-General said that the police investigation, guided by the opinion of a senior barrister, had produced "sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction" on charges of forgery, using a forged document and criminal damage but it had been decided that it was not in the public interest to proceed. In reaching that decision, "matters relating to Mr Allen's health and the surrounding circumstances were significant in deciding that a prosecution was not in the public interest".[57]

a well-planned attempt to corrupt the UK's primary source of historical information

—&#;Detective Inspector Andy Perrott, Financial Times, 3 May [58]

It is hard to imagine actions more damaging to the cause of preserving the nation's heritage, than wilfully forging documents designed to alter our historical record.

—&#;Historian Sir Max Hastings, Financial Times, 3 May [58]

Lost and misplaced records[edit]

Between and , over files had been reported missing from the archives. Notable items reported missing during this period included correspondence from Winston Churchill and documents from the courts of several monarchies. Around of these records have since been recovered, and the archives has reported that they believe most are misplaced rather than permanently lost.[59] In , the archives again received attention when it was reported that around files had been removed – in part or whole – by government officials and reported as missing when not returned. In response to concerns stated by politicians and historians about management of the collection, the archives stressed that the number of missing files is quite small in proportion the entire holdings of the repository – about % – and that, as of , its loss rate was only around documents, annually.[60][61]

MI5 records at TNA[edit]

TNA receives records from MI5 around twice a year.[62] Some information in records—or records themselves—are withheld at the discretion of MI5.[62]

MI5 records in the news[edit]

MI5 records relating to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's time in office have caused some questions and controversy regarding the transparency of the British government. In , journalist Richard Norton-Taylor argued that MI5, and the British government by extension, was purposely withholding some information that the public deserves to know.[63] Norton-Taylor specifically refers to Thatcher's reluctance to allow the publication of two books looking into the impact that intelligence organizations of Britain had on World War II, as well as her worries about British activities in Northern Ireland becoming known to the general public.[64]

Additional MI5 records relating to the blacklisting of government workers during Thatcher's time in office have also prompted questions after their release.[65] In addition to government workers, the blacklists also targeted other groups, such as unions and minorities, that may not fall in line with conservative policies.[66] Debates on the roles of MI5, Whitehall, and Thatcher's administration, have come up in light of these records at TNA and prompted questions of transparency as well as whether or not these blacklists had an effect on the careers of any individuals included.[65] Questions also remain, as of , whether or not there are still blacklists currently in effect and if these could affect government workers, unions, and other individuals possibly included in the blacklists.[67]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^The National Archives Annual Report (PDF), The National Archives, 15 July , archived(PDF) from the original on 17 December , retrieved 19 December
  2. ^"The National Archives". UK Government. Archived from the original on 14 September Retrieved 22 August
  3. ^"Machinery of Government changes: Data protection policy; Information Commissioner's Office; The National Archives; and, Government records management policy:Written statement – HCWS". Inside Government. shoppingdowntown.us Archived from the original on 30 September Retrieved 12 October
  4. ^shoppingdowntown.usived 29 November at the Wayback Machine.""The National Archives". Archived from the original on 25 January Retrieved 5 February ". Retrieved 22 August
  5. ^"Freedom of Information Act ". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from the original on 12 June Retrieved 15 June
  6. ^"Public Records Act ". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from the original on 18 May Retrieved 15 June
  7. ^"General Instructions: The Library". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from the original on 3 June Retrieved 15 June
  8. ^"Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Tourism – shoppingdowntown.us". shoppingdowntown.us. Retrieved 29 March
  9. ^"The opening of the Public Record Office in Kew in ". Your Archives. The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
  10. ^"Home". Deepstore. Archived from the original on 4 October Retrieved 1 February
  11. ^"New role for Chief Executive". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 5 September Retrieved 28 August
  12. ^"Appointment of Chief Executive and Keeper". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 5 September Retrieved 28 August
  13. ^"About Us, About us". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 9 May Retrieved 5 July
  14. ^"Public Records Act ". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 October Retrieved 26 May
  15. ^"HMC Warrant". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 12 June Retrieved 26 May
  16. ^Kingsley, Nick (). "Perspectives and Priorities: The National Archives Vision for Sector Leadership". Journal of the Society of Archivists. 33 (2): – doi/ S2CID&#;
  17. ^"Who we are, what we do and how we operate". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 12 July Retrieved 5 July
  18. ^"Visit us, Museum". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 26 May Retrieved 9 June
  19. ^"Detecting your browser settings". shoppingdowntown.us Retrieved 1 February
  20. ^"Visit us, Why visit us?". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 10 July Retrieved 10 July
  21. ^"Visit us, Registering for a readers ticket". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 November Retrieved 10 July
  22. ^"Visit us, Ordering documents in advance". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 November Retrieved 10 July
  23. ^"Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records". shoppingdowntown.us Archived from the original on 12 November Retrieved 1 February
  24. ^"The National Archives, Discovery". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 May Retrieved 23 November
  25. ^"The National Archives, Licensed Internet Associates". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 30 October Retrieved 23 November
  26. ^"The National Archives, online records". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 30 October Retrieved 23 November
  27. ^"Education". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
  28. ^Archives, The National. "Education – The National Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 10 November
  29. ^Archives, The National. "Education – The National Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 10 November
  30. ^"Access to Archives". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
  31. ^"The National Archives – Access to Archives". Archived from the original on 8 July Retrieved 4 July
  32. ^"Archives Hub Steering Committee meeting, 1 November , University of Manchester". Archives Hub. 1 November Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 5 July
  33. ^"A2A – Access to Archives home". Archived from the original on 28 July Retrieved 5 July
  34. ^"Discovery – The National Archives". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from the original on 4 August
  35. ^ abcdThe National Archives. "National Register of Archives". Archived from the original on 4 August Retrieved 5 July
  36. ^The National Archives. "National Register of Archives: Frequently asked questions". Archived from the original on 16 January Retrieved 20 January
  37. ^"Search Other Archives &#; Accessions to Repositories". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
  38. ^"The National Archives – The ARCHON Directory". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 29 June Retrieved 5 July
  39. ^"Your Archives". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from the original on 17 August Retrieved 8 May
  40. ^The National Archives (14 May ). "Your Archives". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 7 June Retrieved 5 July
  41. ^"Your Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
  42. ^"Your Archives: What can I contribute?". The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
  43. ^"Catalogues and online records". The National Archives. Retrieved 1 February
  44. ^"migration". shoppingdowntown.us Retrieved 1 February
  45. ^"Manorial Documents Register &#; Welcome". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
  46. ^"The National Archives – Search the archives". Retrieved 4 July
  47. ^"The National Archives

    How to look for records of Searching for records using Discovery

    There are two ways to look for a record using Discovery, searching or browsing. This section contains advice on both methods.

    1. Should I search or browse?

    You can use a simple search with just keywords or an advanced searchwith dates and other details if you have them.

    When you search using keywords, you should use words which you think will have been used in the description of the record rather than in the content. Some records have very sparse descriptions where others have lots of detail.

    If you don’t get meaningful results from searching, this might be because the descriptions of the records you are looking for are too basic to be picked up using a keyword search. In this case it might be helpful to browse.

    Browsing might give you can idea of how record descriptions have been worded for particular sets of records.

    Only a small proportion of records can be searched for by name or place. You will probably need to browse as well as search to get the best out of your research.

    For more advice on whether to search or browse specific kinds of records, try looking at our research guidance – this will tell you the best way to find records on specific subjects.

    2. Using the simple search

    You can get started by simply putting keywords into the search box and searching the whole of Discovery. This means you will be searching records held in around 2, archives and institutions across the UK as well as abroad.

    Alternatively, you can select to search only those records ‘Held by The National Archives’ or ‘Available to download from The National Archives’.

    Once you get your results you will see two tabs – ‘records’ and ‘record creators‘ – at the top of the results list. You can switch between the two tabs as often as you need to.

    The results under the ‘record creators’ tab will list organisations, businesses, families, people and manors that match your search terms.

    Using the simple search could find what you are looking for straight away, but:

    • you could miss other results that are useful
    • you could get too many results
    • you could get no results

    If you understand how to choose appropriate keywords your searching will be more productive.

    Choosing keywords

    You need to find a balance between being specific enough to get meaningful results, but not being so detailed that you miss records that are not described with the exact terms you have used.

    Discovery will search for derivatives of your keywords unless you place the word in speech marks – so if you search for the word marine, you will get results for the word mariner too.

    On the other hand, a search for 6th Battalion East Lancashire will find records of military campaign medals, but it could miss war diaries where the description uses the term 6 and not 6th. A search for 6 Battalion East Lancashire will show results that include both 6 and 6th.

    If you are searching for a record creator it may help to include more than one type of search term, such as a family name and a title, or a place name and a type of record.

    Searching with Neville Chamberlain and field marshal will help if searching for Sir Neville Chamberlain’s records.

    Searching with Gainsborough and Noel will help if searching for the papers of the 1st Earl of Gainsborough or the Noel family, Earls of Gainsborough.

    Constructing a keyword search

    Constructing your search carefully can pay off as your results will be more useful. There are some commonly used techniques, known as Boolean searches, that will help you to search more specifically. Use:

    • OR between words to increase your results – so Smith OR Smyth
    • “quotation marks” to find exact phrases (see also Advanced search options)
    • brackets for complex searches – so Inn AND (Southwark OR Lambeth)
    • NOT to exclude results – so Austen NOT Jane
    • an asterisk – * – to pick up variant spellings: Rob*n will find Robin or Robyn. Rob*n* will find Robbins, Robyns and Robinson
    • a question mark -? – to replace single characters eg Rob?n whill find Robin, Robyn, Roben and Robon

    See the section on understanding your search results for advice on why a search has returned too many or too few results.

    3. Using Advanced search

    Advanced search has two tabs – ‘Records’ and ‘Record creators’.

    Records tab

    Advanced search allows you to be more specific about the search terms and records you want to use and search for than a basic or simple search.

    Your search results will be more focused if you use specific search criteria, such as a date or reference, for example. This is particularly helpful if you are unfamiliar with Boolean search terms (see above), as the advanced search effectively inserts the Boolean searches for you.

    Advanced search gives you the option to:

    • use combinations of key words
    • find an exact phrase
    • exclude certain words (for instance if you want to search for the name Austen but not to get results for Jane Austen)

    You can opt to search records that are held at:

    • The National Archives
    • other archives
    • both

    Options on the Records tab

    The records tab has the following fields that you can complete to focus your search:

    Search

    Find words

    There are three sets of search boxes in this section:

    • All of these words: searches for results that match all of the words you have entered into the search box. This is the same as inserting “AND” between the words
    • Exact word or phrase: searches for results that match all the words in exactly the order you have entered them into the search box. This is same as putting quotation marks (” “) around a set of words
    • Any of these words: searches for results that match either one or more of the words you have entered into the search box. This is the same as inserting “OR” between the words

    Don’t find words

    Any words you enter into these fields will be excluded from your search. This is the same as inserting “NOT” between the words.

    Search for or within references

    Using this field you can target your search to a particular set of records if you know the reference which is used for them at an archive. You can enter any part of a reference or enter previous references that may have been used by the record creator or the archive in the past – you will sometimes find these references quoted in published works.

    For records held at The National Archives, use our research guidance to find relevant department reference codes or record series references to get you started.

    References will vary from one archive to another and you may occasionally find reference codes used by more than one institution. Some examples are shown below:

    • WO 95 for First World War unit diaries at The National Archives
    • shoppingdowntown.us for Chester le Street Council records held at the Tyne and Wear Archives
    • MH is used for Ministry of Health records at The National Archives but also by the Imperial War Museum for Brigadier M Henry’s records and a number of other archival institutions for records of one kind or another

    Date

    This function searches the range of dates that the record covers. Some records have very broad date ranges.

    • Search a date range: enter a range of years using the format YYYY
    • Search a specific date: if you need to be more precise, you can search for one specific day or month in a particular year using the formats  MM/YYYY or DD/MM/YYYY

    If you prefer, you can choose one of the date ranges shown at the bottom of the Date section by clicking in the box next to it.

    Some records do not have covering dates in their catalogue description. If you want to capture more records in your search, try searching without a specific date or date range.

    Held by

    • Search all – this will search the catalogues of The National Archives and other archives – this is the default search
    • Search The National Archives – this will only search for records held at The National Archives
    • Search other archives – this will only search for records held outside The National Archives. To search within a specific archive, type the name of the archive into the search box in this seciton. To search all other archives outside The National Archives, simply leave the search box blank.

    If you select ‘Search The National Archives’ then the following options will appear below (note: if you use any of these options you MUST first enter a search term, date or reference as described above):

    Records available for download

    You can choose to only search through records that have been digitised and can be downloaded from our website.

    Records by government department creators

    Type in the name of a government department and see what The National Archives’ reference code is for that department.

    Catalogue levels

    Click in the box to show which catalogue levels you want to search within. You can chose more than one option. Sometimes you might want to search only for specific, individual records (pieces and items); other times you might want to search sets of records (department, division or series) to find what collections relate to the subject you are interested in.

    Record opening date

    Click next to the relevant time period if you only want to find records opened on a specific date or within a date range.

    Record closure status

    Click in the relevant box if you want to search for records according to their closure status. You can choose more than one option.

    Exclude from search

    Click in the box if you don’t want your search to pick up keywords in the titles of documents.

    If you select ‘Search other archives’ you will be able to select a specific archive to search within – to do this, just type in the name of the archive and then select it. If you want to search within multiple archives, simply type in the names one at a time and select them.

    Options on the ‘Record creators’ tab

    Use the ‘Record creators’ tab if you want to search for an institution, family or person that created a set of records (often not the same as the institution or person that currently holds the records). This tab features the following fields to help you focus your search:

    Search

    Find words

    • All of these words: searches for record creators whose name or locations contain all of the words you have entered into the search box. This is the same as inserting “AND” between the words
    • Exact word or phrase: searches for record creators whose name or location contain the words in exactly the order you have entered them into the search box. This is same as putting quotation marks (” “) around a set of words
    • Any of these words: searches for record creators whose name or location contain either one or more of the words you have entered into the search box. This is the same as inserting “OR” between the words

    Don’t find words

    • Any of these words: any words you enter into these fields will be excluded from your search. This is same as inserting “NOT” between the words

    Creator type
    You can use the drop down list to restrict your search to one of the following types of record creator:

    • organisation
    • business
    • manor
    • person
    • diary
    • family

    Similar kinds of institutions are not always defined as the same creator types so you will need to be careful when you are choosing to limit your search this way. For example, some theatres are listed as organisations but others as businesses, depending on their size and structure.

    Some creators are defined as two or more types. For example, creators of personal papers may be defined as families, and therefore catalogued under the family name, but also as a person, and catalogued under an individual’s name too.

    Though a search with either creator type would be successful, a search under the family name may reveal greater numbers of relevant results.

    If you are searching for the records of a person, depending on who they are, it might be useful to search under the family name too (and vice versa). This would be particularly relevant for members of landed families, whose papers may have been catalogued together as one collection and may also be within other collections scattered across the country, reflecting the location of their estates.

    It is also a good idea to search under ‘diaries’ for records of a person. ‘Diary’ is a term Discovery uses for individuals whom we may not know a lot about, sometimes not even their lifetime dates.

    Selecting the business or organisation creator types will allow you to select a number of categories and sub-categories. For example, select business, then the category ‘Transport and communications’ and then the sub-category ‘Railways’.

    Unless you are confident about only wanting results relating to a specific record creator type then it is probably best to carry out a more general search. If you get too many results to make sense out of, you can filter them using the options on the left of the screen.

    Using ‘Find an Archive’

    This tool, located on the Discovery homepage, allows you to search for archival institutions in the UK and beyond, and find out about the kinds of records they hold.

    It replaces what was previously known as the ARCHON Directory.

    See the separate Discovery help section ‘Find an archive‘

    4. Browsing from Discovery homepage

    There is a link from the Discovery homepage to the Browse page. From here you can browse records held by:

    • The National Archives – by the government department who created or inherited the records
    • other archives and institutions who have taken in the records

    Browse records of The National Archives

    Records held at The National Archives are organised by the central government department from which they originate. There are letter codes for each department (for example, DEFE for records of the Ministry of Defence, or KV for records of the Security Service).

    Using the alphabetical chart you can browse the departments by their reference codes – but note that the letter codes don’t always correspond alphabetically to the department names. The descriptions usually give you an overview of the records in that department, with links to their component parts, known as divisions and series.

    Browse records of other archives

    Use the letters to find records held by archives around the UK by browsing through alphabetical lists of archive names.

    Clicking on the ‘Details’ link for each archive will provide descriptions of collections held by the archive.

    At the moment you can only browse the content of around archives’ records in this way. This is because only the detailed catalogues previously hosted on the Access to Archives service have been integrated in to Discovery. We have plans to extend this type of content in Discovery so that it includes more archives’ records in the future.

    Browse other archives

    Browse the alphabetical lists of archives found around the UK and beyond. You may need to experiment a little with the names of archives before you find the alphabetical listing.

    For example, the archive at Queen Mary University of London is listed under ‘L’ because its full listing is ‘London University: Queen Mary University of London’.

    Each entry provides:

    • contact details
    • access information including opening times and wheelchair access
    • summary information about collections and finding aids

    Browse record creators

    You can also browse by the family, person, organisation, business or manor that created the record.

    Each of these record creator types is listed alphabetically with details of the collection and biographical and historical information where it’s available.

    Unlike ‘browsing by archive’, creators have a ‘sort name’ applied to them which means that you will find Roald Dahl under ‘D’ and not ‘R’ and John Lewis Partnership Ltd under ‘L’.

    Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
    TaggedBasildon, Harlow, New Town Movement, South Woodham FerrersИсточник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
Richard Norton-Taylor". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Norton-Taylor, Richard (29 December ). "For their eyes only: the secret stories ministers don't want you to read". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^ abCobain, Ian (24 July ). "'Subversive' civil servants secretly blacklisted under Thatcher". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Cobain, Ian (24 July ). "'Subversive' civil servants secretly blacklisted under Thatcher". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Cobain, Ian; MacAskill, Ewen (25 July ). "Labour: government must say if blacklists are still in place". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • External links[edit]

    Libraries and archives in London

    Public libraries
    and archives
    National
    Council
    • Barking and Dagenham (Valence House Museum)
    • Barnet (East Finchley Library)
    • Brent (Kensal Rise Library, The Library at Willesden Green)
    • City of London (Artizan Street Library, Barbican Library, Guildhall Library, London Metropolitan Archives, Shoe Lane Library)
    • City of Westminster (Westminster Reference Library)
    • Croydon (Ashburton Library, Croydon Central Library, New Addington Library, South Norwood Library, Upper Norwood Library)
    • Haringey (Muswell Hill Library)
    • Hillingdon (Manor Farm)
    • Islington (Finsbury Library, Islington Local History Centre)
    • Kensington and Chelsea (Kensington Central Library)
    • Lambeth (Brixton Library, Carnegie Library, Durning Library, Lambeth Archives, Minet Library, Streatham Library, Upper Norwood Library)
    • Merton (Mitcham Library)
    • Southwark (Dulwich Library, John Harvard Library, Peckham Library)
    • Tower Hamlets (Idea Store)
    • Wandsworth (Battersea Central Library, Putney Library)
    Other libraries
    and archives
    Former libraries
    and archives
    Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
    The National Archives Blog". The National Archives blog. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Home – Archives Media Player". Archives Media Player. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Archives inspire – The National Archives". shoppingdowntown.us. Archived from Category Archives: Office original on 9 December Retrieved 8 May
  • ^ abcdefghiFenton, Ben (3 May ), Category Archives: Office. "Lies and secrets". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 6 May
  • ^ abFenton, Category Archives: Office, Ben (3 May ). "Himmler forgeries in National Archives case will stay unsolved". Financial Times, Category Archives: Office. Archived from the original on 6 May Retrieved 1 February
  • ^Holehouse, Matthew. "Hundreds of historic papers lost from National Archives". shoppingdowntown.us. Retrieved 24 April
  • ^Cobain, Category Archives: Office, Ian. "Government admits 'losing' thousands of papers from 101 Email Address Spider 3.2.9 crack serial keygen Archives". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 April
  • ^Bateman, Tom. "More than government files missing from National Archives". BBC News. Retrieved 23 April
  • ^ ab"MI5 At The National Archives

    Dr Alina Congreve introduces this exciting new network of Archives and Museums across the country. With Essex being the home to three major new towns, all falling into different stages of the movement (Harlow, Basildon and South Category Archives: Office Ferrers), it promises to be of particular relevance to this county.

    Essex Record Office are excited to be the lead partner for a new national network for post-war new towns. This new network brings together the archives and museums that hold significant collections of post-war new town material. It involves 19 archives and museums from across England. The purpose of the network is to share knowledge between members about activities relating to new town archives. This includes sharing good practice in cataloguing; engaging with families and young people; working with local history and heritage societies; and making links with researchers and universities. The members of the new network are at very different stages of engagement with their new town collections, and there is significant potential for peer learning. Secondly, the network provides time and space to develop larger scale collaborative funding bids. The network is open to new members in England and we welcome interest from from museums, local history centres and academics researching new towns.

    New towns mark an important turning point in British history and are a unique contribution to urban development.  British new towns have relevance today for new towns being rapidly developed in Asia, Africa, South America and ‘new’ new towns being planned here in Britain. Many British new towns are facing a period of rapid change, with the developments of the post-war period being replaced with little thought given to the original intentions in their design, Category Archives: Office, or architectural significance of the buildings that are removed. These post-war new towns are paradoxically popular with their long-term residents while having a poor external perception. Greater engagement with new town archives can help make connections between long-term New Town residents and recent arrivals, helping to build community and aid social integration. The archive collection of some new towns have drawn the attention of international scholars and generated books, journal articles and symposia. Others have had relatively little attention, in part due to the lack of cataloguing and also a low profile of the collections.  A better understanding of our post-war new towns can be valuable in positively shaping their future, and this understanding can be achieved through greater access to and engagement with post-war archives.

    To find out more about the network please contact Richard Anderson at Essex Record Office on shoppingdowntown.uson@shoppingdowntown.us or Category Archives: Office Alina Congreve the network co-ordinator on alina@shoppingdowntown.us

    Posted inArchives, Collections, Essex history, The Association of New Town Archives and Museums

    Records management for public bodies

    The role of PRONI in providing records management and guidance to public bodies including the creation of the Northern Ireland Records Management Standard and guidance for financial records.

    PRONI and records management

    Due to the demands of recent legislation, in particular the Data Protection Actthe Freedom of Information Act (FOI)and long standing legislation such as the Public Records Act (NI)the records management function in public authorities needs a large investment in time, energy and resources.

    The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) continues to be at the forefront of developments in the field of records and information management.

    Members of PRONI's records management staff provide advice and guidance to those public servants and professionals who deal with the records management function in their respective organisations.

    Northern Ireland Records Management Standard

    Seeing the need to raise the importance of records management, Category Archives: Office, in consultation with staff from the Northern Ireland government departments, Category Archives: Office, PRONI drew up the Northern Ireland Record Management Standard (NIRMS) in and updated in

    This document gives practical advice on all types of records management issues pertinent to public record-keeping in Northern Ireland.
    Issues covered include:

    Guidance on retention and disposal schedules has been updated and details the current position for public authorities.  This document replaces the earlier guidelines.

    The guidance must be read with the Code of Practice on the Management of Records under Section 46 of the Freedom of Information Act.  The Code highlights sound record keeping practices that must be followed by public authorities.

    Transfer of records

    Guidance has been produced is to assist public bodies in Northern Ireland to manage the transfer of official paper records to the custody of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.   

    Since the introduction of the Freedom of Information Actnew documents have been introduced by PRONI in order to meet the s46 Category Archives: Office of the FOI Act. The PR 14 forms and respective guidance was issued after consultation with the Northern Ireland Departmental Information Managers and Departmental Records Officers. These forms and guidance have recently been updated on account of the implementation of the 20 year rule.

    PR 14 historical 

    For the transfer of historical records to PRONI, that is those that are more than 20 years old as defined by the FOI Act.  (Guidance for reviewers on filling in the PR 14 historical forms).

    PR 14

    For the transfer of records to PRONI, that are less than 20 years old. (Guidance for reviewers on filling in the PR 14 forms).

    Financial records – new guidance

    In light of recent record keeping recommendations issued by the Northern Ireland Audit Office and the Northern Ireland Public Accounts Committee, PRONI advises that publicly funded bodies which have been under an investigation that resulted in significant criticism or Category Archives: Office prosecution should retain the relevant financial records for a period of 10 years from the date that the investigation ended. In a case, where the public body ceases to exist, the funding department is to take the necessary steps to secure all relevant documents and make sure they are preserved.

    As a result of the above recommendation, public bodies that have a disposal schedule signed off by PRONI will be required to set aside the current agreed disposal action for any records that fall into the above category and hold such records for the extended period. Disposal schedules being reviewed or changed will incorporate the above recommendation.

    Guidance for Public Inquiries

    Public inquiries are conducted on behalf of NI Departments or the NI Executive, Category Archives: Office, which means that records created or sent to the Inquiry are ‘public records’ as defined by the Public Records Act (NI)   PRONI has published guidance for the management of information and records created during the course of public inquiries held in Northern Ireland.

    Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
    Richard Norton-Taylor". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Norton-Taylor, Richard (29 December ), Category Archives: Office. "For their eyes only: the secret stories ministers don't want you to read". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^ abCobain, Ian (24 July ). "'Subversive' civil servants secretly blacklisted under Thatcher". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Cobain, Ian (24 July ). "'Subversive' civil servants secretly blacklisted under Thatcher", Category Archives: Office. The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Cobain, Ian; MacAskill, Ewen (25 July ). "Labour: government must say if blacklists are still in place". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 November
  • External links[edit]

    Libraries and archives in London

    Public libraries
    and archives
    National
    Council
    • Barking and Dagenham (Valence House Museum)
    • Barnet (East Finchley Library)
    • Brent (Kensal Rise Library, The Library at Willesden Green)
    • City of London (Artizan Street Library, Barbican Library, Guildhall Library, London Metropolitan Archives, Shoe Lane Library)
    • City of Westminster (Westminster Reference Library)
    • Croydon (Ashburton Library, Croydon Central Library, New Addington Library, South Norwood Library, Upper Norwood Library)
    • Haringey (Muswell Hill Library)
    • Hillingdon (Manor Farm)
    • Islington (Finsbury Library, Islington Local History Centre)
    • Kensington and Chelsea (Kensington Central Library)
    • Lambeth (Brixton Library, Carnegie Library, Durning Library, Lambeth Archives, Minet Library, Category Archives: Office, Streatham Library, Upper Norwood Library)
    • Merton (Mitcham Library)
    • Southwark (Dulwich Library, John Harvard Library, Peckham Library)
    • Tower Hamlets (Idea Store)
    • Wandsworth (Battersea Central Library, Putney Library)
    Other libraries
    and archives
    Former libraries
    and archives
    Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]

    Share socially -

    • What are the latest Microsoft Office updates?
    • What’s new in Microsoft in October ?
    • How do I install the latest Microsoft updates?

    With monthly Patch Tuesday updates and an extensive Roadmap, it can be difficult to keep track of what Microsoft Office updates are on the way, Category Archives: Office, work out how they will affect you, and what you need to do to make the most of your Microsoft investment.

    We’ve pulled together the most important updates from the last few months to ensure you make the most of Microsoft’s ongoing developments.

    Remember to follow Category Archives: Office on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to be kept right up to date on all the updates and how we can help you make Microsoft work for your business.

    Current Microsoft Office updates:


    Update:Teams templates to include Power Automate Templates

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean Category Archives: Office you? When you create a team, recommended flow templates will automatically appear for you to choose from, Category Archives: Office. With Power Automate templates available, you’ll be able to speed up the process of setting up a team by automatically including relevant workflows.

    Installation requirements: A selection of curated Power Automate flow templates will be available to you when you go to select Microsoft provided templates. Automation really Category Archives: Office the future for Microsoft!


    Update:Pilot and deploy Teams for frontline workers with the onboarding wizard

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? The FLW (Frontline worker) onboarding wizard speeds up the process of onboarding frontline workers by allowing admins to create teams and assign roles to up to users at a time. Each role then receive a policy package which generates a tailored teams experience.

    Installation requirements: Go to the left navigation of the MS admin center, select Setup, Apps and email, and then click View under ‘Get your frontline workers up and running’, then click Get started when you’re ready to go. All it takes is assigning a Converter Archives - PC Product key name, team owners and adding users to your team.

    A sound onboarding process is key for a successful remote working environment. Book a FREE demo of our Mercury Digital Workplace product here.


    Update:Present from PowerPoint to Teams and improve presentation capabilities

    October Microsoft Office Updates - Present PowerPoints directly in Teams image

    Current Status: Available

    Installation requirements: Look for the ‘Present in Teams’ button in PowerPoint when in a Teams call.

    What does this mean for you? This stops you from needing to upload PowerPoints in Teams ahead of time or spend unnecessary time screen sharing and alternating between Tabs. It makes the process of preparing and delivering presentations in Teams simpler, faster, and hassle free. Read more about integration and the power of an intranet here.


    Update: Left navigation updates in Teams Admin Center

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? The Left navigation bar now allows you to access more of the key settings and sections of Teams, making it easier for admins to manage, Category Archives: Office, edit and maintain their Teams channels.

    Installation requirements: As with many Microsoft Office updates, this is applied automatically to the latest versions of the Teams app


    Update:Share Feedback in mobile app

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? This updates means feedback for Microsoft can be sent directly without the need for extra emails (great news seeing as the average employee receives over emails a day!).

    Installation requirements: Go to Settings, and select Help & Feedback.


    Update: Teams meetings through Apple CarPlay

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? With Hybrid working a sign of the times, Microsoft are making it even easier for employees to work on the go by enabling you to join Teams Calls whilst commuting, on the school run, or running errands in the car. In doing so, Category Archives: Office, they make it easier for work and home life to seamlessly merge, but perhaps run the risk of making 24/7 availability an expectation of remote working employees. The feature is available in audio format only and also allows you to use Voice Command to message other Teams contacts.

    Installation requirements: Find the Teams icon on your Apple CarPlay Screen


    Update:Press “Ctrl Spacebar” Category Archives: Office Speak

    Microsoft Office updates Play Teams meetings on Car Play

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? It is now easier than ever to begin speaking in a meeting, without the Category Archives: Office to use your mouse and unmute your Mic. This comes as Microsoft aim to improve collaboration across their platforms with Hybrid working very much a sign of the future to come.

    Installation requirements: Simply press Ctrl + Spacebar and you&#;re ready to go (best to try it in an internal meeting though. We don’t want anymore embarrassing ‘your mic isn’t on’ mistakes at this stage in the remote working game!)


    Update: Time Sensitive Emails in Play My Emails (PME)

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? Outlook Mobile will now prioritise emails it believes to be time sensitive by reading these to you first in Play My Emails (PME). This will ensure you don’t miss important opportunities, deadlines, changes etc. and that you’re always on top of the most important elements of your workload. What’s more, you can spend less time scrolling through your inbox and more time getting those important tasks ticked off.

    Installation requirements: Ensure you have PME Category Archives: Office up by going to Outlook Mobile Settings, Siri Shortcuts, Play my Emails, and then tap the red button to record your siri shortcut. For information on how PME works on Android devices, see here: Microsoft Outlook now supports Play My Emails on Android (shoppingdowntown.us) (integrated link)


    Update: Simplified Breakout Room assignment 

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? Breakout Rooms provided Category Archives: Office great opportunity for including small group collaboration within large group calls when they were introduced in However, with presenters needing to individually assign participants to rooms, it resulted in a clunky experience on both ends. Now, with the ability to select multiple participants to add or remove from rooms, the process is much quicker and will allow more time to be spent on collaboration.

    Installation requirements: Look out for the separate pop up in Teams after selecting ‘Assign Participants’


    Update: Pin messages and participants

    Microsoft updates pin messages and people in teams

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? Whilst the ability to pin specific Category Archives: Office conversations is not new for Teams, all participants can now pin and unpin specific messages to be highlighted at the top of the chat. This supports GIFs and images, but is Category Archives: Office to be used for text based messages.

    Installation requirements: Use the center of the room console to pin up to 9 participants at a time in a Teams meeting, and simple click the three dots next to the message you’d like to pin to see the options.


    Update: Improved delivery for Live Events

    Current Status: Available

    What does this mean for you? Virtual events started with pub quizzes and friendly cocktail nights, but with the worldwide reach and Category Archives: Office costs, they are a certain reality for the future. Microsoft Office updates their systems in accordance with demand and they have responded to this new demand by allowing you to scale Teams Live Events toattendees. You can work with eCDN support, Peer5, to optimise your live events AND you can restart events if you end them earlier than intended – no more panicking as you lose the audience you’ve spent weeks building up, Category Archives: Office. This final feature is Category Archives: Office available to the Producer of the Event. It’s safe to say, Microsoft Category Archives: Office Virtual live events as a lasting result of the Pandemic that they can make the most of.

    Installation requirements: To allow for the increase in attendees, you must engage the Microsoft LEAP team, and to benefit from Microsoft’s Peer5 acquisition you should get in contact with them or Microsoft directly. For Producers restarting a Live Event, simply click and select ‘Restart Event’.


    What&#;s Coming next?

    That’s the roundup of the recent Microsoft updates for Octoberbut with constant development and investment, Category Archives: Office, a constant stream of updates will be coming your way throughout Autumn. Keeping up to date is the single best way to make the most of your Microsoft investment and ensure that your business processes are optimised. If you need support figuring out how to make Microsoft work for you, get in contact for a free Ask the Expert Session with one of our Office experts.

    Keep an eye on our social media accounts for information regarding the latest Microsoft Office updates, but if you’re anything like us, you’ll want to be ahead of the game, so here’s a sneak preview of what to expect in the next few weeks:

    Microsoft Office updates coming soon:

    OneDrive and SharePoint: Improved Move or Copy user experience

    We&#;re refreshing the Move/Copy user experience in OneDrive and SharePoint to make it easier for you to choose where to move or copy your files and folders.

    October

    Microsoft Search: Work Search Shortcut in Edge

    To help users stay focused and find work results faster when searching from the Microsoft Edge address bar, Category Archives: Office, Microsoft Search is adding the capability to create customized address bar shortcuts for your organization. With this feature, Edge users can type a shortcut keyword in address bar, Category Archives: Office, then press the Tab key followed by their work query, they will see internal work results on Microsoft Search.

    October

    Microsoft Viva: Quiet time settings in Teams and Outlook

    To help create better boundaries and protect your personal time, later this year Viva Insights will offer the ability to configure quiet time to silence mobile notifications from Outlook and Teams outside your working hours PDF-XChange Viewer 2.5.199 crack serial keygen well as provide personalized insights on how well you are disconnecting. You will also be able to set quiet time directly from Teams and Outlook mobile.


    Like this blog? Share your feedback on our LinkedIn and allow us to give you the content YOU want to see.

    Microsoft, News, Category Archives: Office, OfficeSharePoint, UncategorizedMicrosoft Office updatesTony Pounder

    Источник: [shoppingdowntown.us]
    Hospital Records Database

    watch the thematic video

    How to Organize Papers with Magazine Holders (Konmari Inspired)

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